Category Archives: Homebuyers

Money Monday: Home sales up in California

California home sales register nominal annual increase in September

Source: C.A.R.

urban real estate prices, most live in suburbsCalifornia existing home sales ticked up in September on a year-over-year basis for the first time in seven months as a shortage of homes available for sale continues to hold back the market, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) said today.

Making sense of the story

  • Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California totaled a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 425,680 units in September, according to information collected by C.A.R. from more than 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2016 if sales maintained the September pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.
  • The September figure was up 1.3 percent from the revised 420,360 level in August and up 0.8 percent compared with home sales in September 2015 of a revised 422,360. Home sales remained above the 400,000 pace for the sixth straight month, and the year-over-year increase was the first since January.
  • “While higher sales both on a monthly and an annual basis is a glimmer of good news, with most of the home-buying season behind us for 2016, it’s not enough to tip the scales for an increase above 2015’s sales pace,” said C.A.R. President Pat “Ziggy” Zicarelli. “With listings continuing to decline and demand still strong, especially at the lower end of the market, affordability will remain a challenge for would-be buyers.”
  • The statewide median price remained above the $500,000 mark for the sixth straight month, with minimal signs of cooling down outside of a few select markets. The median price of an existing, single-family detached California home was down 2.3 percent in September to $514,320 from $526,580 in August. September’s median price increased 6.1 percent from the revised $484,670 recorded in September 2015. The median sales price is the point at which half of homes sold for more and half sold for less; it is influenced by the types of homes selling, as well as a general change in values. The monthly price decline is primarily due to seasonal factors.

Full story: www.car.org/newsstand/newsreleases/2016releases/september2016sales

Millennials Make Up Half of US Real Estate Buyers

News from Zillow’s recent real estate study

HomeForSaleSignZillow released a study on Tuesday, revealing some of their real estate findings; including: “half of all buyers are under age 36, meaning the Millennial generation is driving more of the housing market than we previously understood.”

Another finding had to do with the hiring of real estate agents. They found that “buyers aren’t replacing the expertise of real estate agents with online research—but they are doing a tremendous amount of research online before contacting an agent. Those who start their home searches online are actually more likely to use an agent than other buyers.”

The report summarizes Zillow’s findings in a 164-page report; click here to read about all of the real estate findings in detail.

Money Monday: Multi-generational households

The multi-generational home is growing, and some make the choice to live with family for economical reasons.

multigenerationalAn August 2016 Pew Research report shows that “a record 60.6 million Americans — almost one in five – lived in multigenerational households in 2014, defined by Pew as a having two or more adult generations or grandparents and grandchildren. This is about a 30% increase in just seven years; in 2007 there were 46.5 million people living in multigen households…” (Forbes. “Multigenerational Living is Back and That’s a Good Thing”)

“…’The economic downturn in 2007 to 2009 may have driven families to come together under one roof out of need, but today this increasing multigen living is by choice,’ says Donna Butts, executive director of Generations United, a group dedicated to improving lives of children and older adults through intergenerational programs and services.” (Forbes. “Multigenerational Living is Back and That’s a Good Thing”)

Read more in Forbes’ article here: www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2016/10/09/multigenerational-living-is-back-and-thats-a-good-thing/?ss=personalfinance#2c8dc0cf5dac

Money Monday: Declining 30-year mortgage rates

Source: Associated Press

mortgage rates and property taxesLong-term U.S. mortgage rates edged lower this week. As rates remain at historically low levels, homeowners taking advantage of the chance to refinance their mortgages have pushed up refinancing activity.

Mortgage giant Freddie Mac said Thursday the average for the benchmark 30-year fixed-rate mortgage declined to 3.44 percent from 3.46 percent last week. The average rate is down from 3.90 percent a year ago, and is close to its all-time low of 3.31 percent in November 2012. The 15-year fixed mortgage rate eased to 2.76 percent from 2.77 percent.

Full story: finance.yahoo.com/news/us-average-30-mortgage-rate-144315073

Call Me for Residential Real Estate!

Now that an exciting high school, college and NFL season is upon us, residential real estate has been even more exciting this year! Sellers and buyers are reaping the profits of sales and benefits of purchasing NOW with interest rates still near historic lows.

football-field

It’s time — and your turn to get in the game and score your touchdown today! Don’t be left on the sidelines; call me now!

If you know someone looking to sell or buy, rest assured you know that they’re with the #1 Team!

Money Monday: Housing affordability worry

Homebuyers getting more anxious about affordability

Source: Investors Business Daily

Homebuyers in the U.S. are growing more anxious about their ability to afford a dwelling of their own, and that’s especially true of millennials, says a new survey from Redfin. Another concern they have is high rent, with nearly half of first-time homebuyers surveyed saying that it pushed them into the housing market. And while low inventory was blamed as a major factor in July’s drop in sales of existing homes, that was third on the list of homebuyers’ worries, after affordability and competition from other shoppers.

money house

Making sense of the story

In previous surveys, the second- and third-most cited concerns made up a far higher percentage of total responses. Last year it was 31.4 percent, while in May it was 33.5 percent. In other words, affordability is gaining prominence as the number one concern among buyers.

Among the 1,887 homebuyers participating in the Redfin survey, those who said affordability
was their biggest concern grew to 28.1 percent this summer, compared to 26.6 percent a year ago. Anxiety about competition in the market again got the next-biggest share of responses, but it was cited by only 13 percent this year, compared to 17 percent in 2015.

Worry about lack of inventory again was third, but fell 2 percentage points — from 14.4 percent
of responses to 12.4 percent. The only other response reaching double digits was the share of
homebuyers who had “no concerns,” which increased slightly to 10.4 percent from 9.5 percent.

Among millennial homebuyers, nearly a third said affordability was their top concern. About half that number (16 percent) expressed worry about competition from other buyers, while about 1 in 8 (12 percent) were most troubled about the available housing inventory. And slightly more than 1 in 10 said they were the most uneasy about coming up with a down payment.

Full story: www.investors.com/news/real-estate/homebuyers-getting-more-anxious-about-affordability-redfinsays

Money Monday: Many full-time workers face housing affordability problems

Source: Harvard

While statistics on the gap in affordable housing clearly indicate the magnitude of the problem, they mask the extent of the difficulties that certain low-wage workers often face in obtaining a unit they can afford, particularly in major metro areas.

housing market

Making sense of the story

  • Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate that in many markets, most full-time cashiers, retail and sales persons, and food preparation workers would have been unable to afford even a modest one-bedroom apartment.
  • The fair market rent of a two-bedroom apartment was even further out of reach for these workers: as high as $2,062 in San Francisco and over $1,400 Washington, DC, Boston, New York, and Los Angeles.
  • Other occupations where median annual wages were inadequate for households to afford a
    modest one-bedroom apartment include—but are not limited to—EMTs and paramedics,
    childcare workers, security guards, and several types of healthcare support occupations.
  • All of these jobs are vital to local economies, and support a variety of businesses and services required for healthy, growing communities.
  • Wage stagnation among low-income households is certainly part of the problem. Between 2001 and 2014, the median real household income for renters in the bottom quintile fell 9.9 percent, while income for households in the top quintile was up 3.1 percent.
  • To make ends meet, many low-wage households must reduce expenditures on food and
    healthcare, move to areas which are less accessible and require longer commute times, or double up with family or roommates.
  • Nearly a third of the nation’s 7 million renters earning less than $35,000 in 2014 had minors
    living at home, and fully half of these families reported being severely cost-burdened in the same year—paying more than half of their incomes for housing.

Read the full story: housingperspectives.blogspot.com/2016/08/many-full-time-workers-face-housing.html

Money Monday: Renters are increasingly paying more for less

“New apartments hitting the rental market in 2016 are 8% smaller than they were 10 years ago, according to a recent report from online rental marketplace RentCafe.

for rent

“Meanwhile, rents for all apartments on the market have risen 7% in the last five years.

“This year, the average square footage of all new apartments, including studios, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments, was 934 square feet. Just a decade ago, the new units coming online offered an average of 1,015 square feet.

“The national average for rent this year is $1,296 compared to $977 in 2011…”

Read more from CNN here, or read the quoted report from RentCafe here.

If you’re thinking of buying a home instead of renting (especially after reading about this), then please contact me to see how I can help! 

Contact me!

John A Silva | (619) 890-3648 | Email