Tag Archives: advertising

Are ALL Real Estate Agents Equal?

In light of the fact that there has been some shocking news regarding a certain local real estate agent from San Diego, along with his wife and staff, being accused of duping over $15 million dollars from banks, investors and homeowners, I understand that many people question whether all real estate agents are the same, in acting dishonestly.

The normal response for people who personally know an agent of integrity, whom they even refer to all their family and friends, will say this is just an individual, and is not a general reflection of the masses. Yet I read and hear on social media websites that this categorizes all real estate agents as being dishonest, even those who have toiled for years and been ethical and forthright for their entire careers being cauterized. These are the individuals who need an education because of bad experiences, and I now challenge them to a call to action, to interview an individual agent like myself, while developing a relationship with the right real estate agent at their disposal whenever the need arises. A good real estate agent will have a grasp of the law at all times in the ever-changing, complicated world and real estate market we now have, then go to people to support them in the legal arena.

Are all real estate agents equal?My philosophy has always been that if you don’t ever get to speak with and do business with the real estate agent who is representing you, BEWARE! Many agents in the housing market have large teams of individuals, while the service and experience levels are severely low, due to new and inexperienced agents who look for high-profit opportunities, because of the low pay they earn. These mistakes lead to poor service, complaints to local association boards and the DRE; but more importantly, thousands of dollars in losses from the client’s pocket book. This may well be the case with this certain individual that is now in trouble.

I have seen another certain individual always advertising on local television, as another example of this type of representation, while the results produced have been average at best, according to many people I have helped and their friends giving feedback about them. As the old saying does: Don’t be duped by the fast-talking, nice-dressed and loveable smile.

While I am not here to condemn any individual, I feel my duty is to educate the public masses in the regard of how to hire the right agent to assist you in buying or selling your home. As another cliche goes, bigger is not better, but seeing the overall picture of their track record, years in the business and levels of hands-on experience are paramount, while being able to work directly with that individual on an ongoing basis is a must.

As in all crimes committed by people in authority; such as police officers, teachers, politicians, doctors, etc–there is that huge feeling of betrayal, while the important question of how did this happen by an individual held in high esteem in many circles of the community and their peers?

I hope that the blue-collar hardworking real estate agents like me will once again shine through this mess that the small minority of high-rollers create to most importantly the benefit of you, the client.

Call me today (at 619-890-3648) for an evaluation of your property or home search, and the right direction you deserve.

San Diego MLS fights for Zillow, Trulia exposure

 Agency wants agents’ info to be listed prominently on popular search sites

Article by U~T San Diego here: “San Diego MLS fights for Zillow, Trulia exposure“.  This story was updated Wednesday Feb. 8 with additional comments from a real estate syndicator and housing search sites.

Sandicor - MLSA debate over listing data continues between real estate brokers and websites like Zillow and Trulia as the San Diego region’s Multiple Listing Service seeks to control content to outside parties.

Sandicor, the county’s MLS, has added a text field to its listings that allows members to enter contact information, including names, email addresses and brokerage websites. The information, along with the usual listing data, would be disseminated by syndication websites such as ListHub and Point2, which are sources of information for popular real estate sites.

The main idea is that the contact information in the extra field would be displayed prominently for home hunters to see, nixing any confusion over the listing agent and an agent who is advertising on Trulia or Zillow.

The change, in the works since October, follows last week’s heated discussion after a San Diego brokerage cut ties with those two real estate behemoths.

“I think it will be clear to consumers if they want to contact the listing agent, they can,” Sandicor CEO Ray Ewing said. “If not, they can contact others who have ads around (the listings.) We give them the choice.”

Real estate brokers, who can opt-out of filling out the new field, also will benefit because the extra information will help drive traffic back to their websites, Ewing added.

It is believed Sandicor is the first MLS to make such a system change, Ewing said…

Want to read more about Sandicor’s latest change? Visit MLS Fights Back for Its Brokers, a blog from a real estate IT consulting firm.

Read more from this article by U~T San Diego here: “San Diego MLS fights for Zillow, Trulia exposure“. 

What do you think about this issue?  Obviously, this move to my local MLS, Sandicor, affects me–in that my listings have less visibility online.  But it does affect me on the flip side, with Zillow and Trulia not allowing my contact information to show up on my own listings.  

4 ways to attract more buyers

Some buyers are looking for a home that’s located in a specific neighborhood. Others have more flexibility regarding where they live. But most buyers share one thing in common: They want a home that’s in move-in condition.

Start working on attracting buyers to your home by putting the property in good condition before it goes on the market. In most cases, it’s not a good idea to show your home to a prospective buyer before it’s ready to be shown. Photos should also wait until your home presents itself well.

homes for salePay attention to “curb appeal”; first impressions are lasting. Some buyers drive by without taking a look inside if they don’t like the way a house looks from the street. The yard should be clean and tidy. Replace the front lawn if it’s dead; the same goes for plants that have seen better days. Flowering plants make your home look festive and inviting.

Peeling paint should be touched up, if possible. If an entire exterior paint job is called for, consider changing the color scheme to enhance the appeal. One seller repainted the exterior of his home before selling without consulting his agent or a colorist. He repainted using the existing color scheme, which was out of date. The house didn’t sell quickly. When it did, the first thing the buyers wanted to do was change the color of the exterior.

Repair deferred maintenance, particularly if it’s visible from the street. You want to convey the impression that your home has been well maintained. If you can’t afford to repair and paint the white picket fence in front of your house, it would be better to remove it than leave it.

Houses that don’t have much architectural appeal can often be improved by the addition of shutters. Houses that don’t show much from the street can be enhanced with an architecturally intriguing gate or entryway. You want to peak buyers’ interest in seeing what they can’t see from the street.

HOUSE HUNTING TIP: List with an agent who can provide wide exposure for your home, including extensive Internet advertising. The vast majority of homebuyers search for homes online. Buyers discount Internet listings that do not have photos, and they gravitate toward those with many photos and quality photos. Make sure that the agent you list with will not put your home on the multiple listing service or Internet without plenty of quality, representative photos — 15 or more is good.

The importance of Internet advertising should not be underestimated. The Internet is global and available 24/7. Buyers often find the listing they want to buy on the Internet before their agent has seen it. After surfing the Internet, some buyers decide to buy outside the area they were focusing on if they see something elsewhere that appeals to them.

Local marketing may work in some cases, but you wouldn’t want to cut yourself short. Broad exposure of your listing to the market is an integral part of selling.

Although the buyer for your home could come from anywhere, you do want it to be exposed to the local agents. Your agent should hold the listing open for real estate agents as soon as it’s ready to be shown. Repeat broker open houses may be necessary to make sure a representative number of agents see the listing.

Public open houses are good exposure. Some buyers still find the home they buy at an open house. However, they don’t pay off like they did during the bubble market. Encourage private showings, which require that you make it easy for agents to show your home to their buyers.

THE CLOSING: The best way to attract buyers to your listing is to price it right for the market. Otherwise, all of your efforts will be for naught.

Dian Hymer, a real estate broker with more than 30 years’ experience, is a nationally syndicated real estate columnist and author of “House Hunting: The Take-Along Workbook for Home Buyers” and “Starting Out, The Complete Home Buyer’s Guide.” View the article here.

If you want to sell, I’m the Realtor for you! Give me a call at (619)337-3262!