Tag Archives: buying a house

How to Look at a House Like a Home Inspector

You should hire a qualified professional home inspector when buying a home; however, it’s useful to learn the basics of home inspection yourself. Being able to see a house though an inspector’s eyes allows you to get a general assessment of a home in a short amount of time, helps you know how to prepare for an inspection, and provides guidelines for giving your home an occasional checkup. Continue reading

What are Loan Points?

mortgage rates and property taxesWhen shopping for a mortgage rate, it is necessary to pay attention to the details. Loan points are often overlooked as buyers are fixated on getting the lowest interest rate; however they are an important point to consider when picking your mortgage.

Loan points are Continue reading

TOP TEN Legal Mistakes Buyers Make

In the complicated maze of trying to buy a home are the pratfalls and obstacles that can be so costly that you can regret ever buying a new home!
Call a Realtor(R) who is full time and has the track record to get the results you deserve.  The Department of Real Estate website will be able to tell you if there are any reprimands or suspension for any licensed agent or broker.

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San Diego real estate market – homes sales 2013

Is it more important to have a great company or a great agent representing you in selling or buying? Consider carefully since a home is most likely the biggest asset you have!

I will personally answer that it’s like baking a cake: the agent is the cake, and the company they work for is the frosting! Continue reading

Making an Offer

Time for nervous anticipation. You’ve found the home you want, and your Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties Sales Professional says you need to act fast. Yet you want to be as calm and objective as possible. The expertise A Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties Sales Professional can give you at negotiating time is priceless.

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Five real estate tasks best done early

While I’m a big proponent of avoiding premature real estate moves, there are a number of tasks that are best done before you think they need to be. These are things that tend to take longer or often turn out to be more complex than people plan for.

Please, give me a call if I can help you in your home shopping process in any way! (619) 890-3648

1. Check your credit. Everyone knows that you should check your credit, or have your mortgage broker do it, some time before you get ready to start house hunting. What people fail to factor in are the real-life turnaround times on rehabbing your credit in the event there are errors, fraudulent entries, balances you need to bring down, or trade lines (credit accounts) you need to build up in order to qualify for a home loan.

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Four steps to buying a house in 2012

Q: I am on a mission to buy a home. I’ve wanted to own a home my entire life, and thought I would miss the opportunity to buy while the market was down, because I had no real savings when the market crashed. I think I’m ready, though, and prices still seem low. What should I be doing now to make this happen in 2012?

A: The recession has done lots of favors for buyers-to-be, including dropping prices and interest rates to bargain levels. But it has also created a lending and housing market climate in which loans are tough to get, tensions about buying into a down market run high, and transactions are harder and longer to close than they have ever been.

Here are the things to do now, to buy a home this year:

1. Fix credit problems. More deals than ever are dying on the vine, and credit problems are a top reason home-sale transactions fall out of escrow. Detect and correct errors on your credit report now by reviewing the federally mandated free reports you can get at AnnualCreditReport.com.

2. Study up. Do some research, both online and offline, into things like:

Areas: Start your online research into decision points like tax rates, school districts, neighborhood character and even prices in various areas. Check out NabeWise.com for some local insight into neighborhood flavor and personality.

When you start connecting with local agents, ask them to brief you on neighborhood market dynamics. They can give you a deeper view into need-to-knows like how long homes typically stay on the market and whether they generally go for more or less than the asking price, so you can be smart about how you search vis-à-vis what you have to spend.

Agents: This is the perfect time to ask your family and friends for a referral to an agent they know, have used and love. Then, follow up by doing an online search for the agent’s name and seeing what sort of online reviews and activities you find. When you’ve narrowed the field down to a few, call them up and set up a meeting to find out if you’re a good fit.

Distressed properties: In some areas, more than 40 percent of the homes on the market are short sales and foreclosures, and they involve a very different timeline and set of facts than traditional home sales. Read up and talk with the agent candidates you interview about what you should expect from these types of listings, to minimize surprise and manage your expectations way in advance.

3. Save even more. Sounds like you’ve worked hard for a number of years to save enough cash that you think you’re in the clear when it comes to funding your down payment and closing costs. Studies show that after months of saving, people often let up and relax into a spending season. Even at your early stage in the process, it’s easy to start noticing and buying the furnishings and touches you want to install in your new home.

Although you shouldn’t feel deprived or forgo amazing and affordable deals on things you know you’re going to need, rest assured that no matter what amount of cash you have on hand, when you start house hunting, making offers, closing your transaction or moving in, the time will definitely come when you’ll wish you had more.

You might want to ratchet up your offer a bit to best another buyer, or you might just end up with a place that needs a little sprucing up. It might be months before you know exactly what you’ll need extra cash for, but now is not the time to press the gas pedal when it comes to your monthly spending.

4. Purge. Now’s the time to sell, donate or give away as much of your personal possessions as you can. Use the proceeds to pad your cash cushion, or tuck the donation receipts away for your tax records next year.

Start here, and chances are good that your house hunt — and purchase — will be in full swing by spring, if not sooner.

Tara-Nicholle Nelson is an author and the Consumer Ambassador and Educator for real estate listings search site Trulia.com.