Tag Archives: California Association of Realtos

Pre-Happy Independence Day 2014! A San Diego Real Estate Lawsuit has been settled

A San Diego Real Estate Lawsuit has been settled

buyers and sellers real estate disclosuresThis very interesting case is a mixed bag of “he said, she said” accusations and statements. All in all, when selling your home it always pays to DISCLOSE EVERYTHING  of past and present conditions, whether “latent” or “evident” and when buying a home, have thorough inspections while reviewing all paperwork from seller carefully.

In this specific case, the buyer sues the seller and agents for negligence and failure to disclose, withdraws suit to seller and buyer agent and keeps statutory failure to tell seller of defects in home since agent was selling same home for 2nd time after current seller bought home. Agent is awarded sanctions or damages for attorney fees in counter suit against buyer for incorrect lawsuit since the disclosures were provided to buyer by agent.

The following article was provided by California Association of Realtors, Real Legal Department. Continue reading

Six signs a home will hold its resale value

Most buyers have a wish list of features they’d like to have in a home. Often missing from that list is how salable the home will be when they later decide to sell.

Generally, buyers deal indirectly with resale value. They want a home they can buy at market value or less. They want to buy a home that will retain its value. They want to buy a home that will suit their needs. They want to buy a home they can make their own.

A listing that’s priced low to sell fast may be one that will have good resale value only if you use this marketing strategy. The low price may offset an incurable defect, such as a location on a busy street.

There’s nothing wrong with buying a home on a busy street as long as (1) you buy it at a price that reflects the location issue; (2) it suits your long-term needs; and (3) you understand that you will probably have to discount the price accordingly when you sell, depending on the market at the time.

In a hot seller’s market, buyers are desperate to buy. They often overpay, and they are more likely to overlook defects that they would shun in a sour market.

Resale value has become a bigger issue since the housing recession began five years ago. Buyers are more cautious in their home-buying decisions. They don’t want to buy just any home; they don’t want to make a mistake and end up wanting to move in a slow market in which they might lose money.

The homes that hold their resale value well are the ones that appeal to a broad cross section of buyers; offer a good floor plan that works for different lifestyles; have a good amount of space but are not enormous and expensive to maintain; and exhibit a pride of ownership. They should also be in good condition.

Location is also a critical element of resale value. There are market niches that are always in demand, in both hot and soft markets. For example houses in neighborhoods with close proximity to shops, cafés and public transportation systems.

That’s not to say that every listing in these neighborhoods sell quickly. To sell, it needs to be priced right for the market.

Six signs a home will hold its resale valueIt’s easier to recognize a home with good resale value in the current market than it was in the bubble market of 2005 and 2006 when virtually all homes sold in many areas. In a soft market, the homes that sell within 30 to 60 days are either good homes or good deals.

Ideally, you want to buy a home that has good resale value. Not one that’s just a good deal. There’s no urgency to buy now in many areas, although it would be nice to take advantage of record-low interest rates. But you shouldn’t buy a home that won’t work for you long term just to lock in a great interest rate.

Even though there are a lot of homes for sale on the market, in many areas there is a not a surplus of quality inventory on the market. One reason for the lack of quality homes on the market is that many sellers are waiting for a better time to sell. Another reason is that homes with good resale value don’t tend to change hands that often.

THE CLOSING: There may be good news ahead. Leslie Appleton-Young, chief economist for the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, predicts that sellers who have been waiting for a better time to sell may decide they’ve waited long enough and list their homes for sale in 2012.

Dian Hymer is a real estate broker with more than 30 years’ experience and is a nationally syndicated real estate columnist and author.