Tag Archives: distressed properties

Freddie Mac economist makes ’13 housing predictions

Frank Nothaft, chief economist for mortgage giant Freddie Mac, is in San Diego this weekend for the American Economic Association annual meeting. He took some time Friday to talk to U-T San Diego about his national and regional predictions for housing in 2013. Here are some excerpts:

On housing activity: It began to turn around in 2012 and will continue to pick up in 2013. Housing starts nationwide were up 25 percent in 2012 from 2011. Home sales were up about 9 percent during that same time frame. Housing starts this year may rise an additional 20 percent to 25 percent and home sales may rise another 8 percent to 10 percent. Southern California also will see pickup in home prices and sales.

On mortgage rates: Mortgage rates are going to stay at a very low level, mainly due to the Federal Reserve’s decision to continue buying up large quantities of mortgage-backed securities. That pushes up the price of those securities, which reduces the yield and drives the very-low interest rates. The 30-year fixed conforming loan rate is expected to remain below 4 percent…

Read the rest of SignonSanDiego.com’s article here: “Freddie Mac economist makes ’13 housing predictions”.

California home prices are at a 4-year high

Persistently declining for-sale home inventory helped push the median price of California homes up to its highest level in four years in August, according to a report by the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.

Closed sales of existing single-family homes in the Golden State also saw gains, rising 2.3 percent on an annual basis in August to a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 511,240 units. That’s a 3.4 percent decline from July, but the fifth straight month to see a year-over-year increase.

“A lack of inventory remains an issue, as the housing supply fell more than 30 percent from last year,” said LeFrancis Arnold, the Association’s president, in a statement.

“Inventory levels are at the lowest levels we’ve seen in seven years, and we are starting to see the supply shortage conditions having a negative impact on sales in the Central Valley and the Inland Empire, where REO (real estate owned) properties are in short supply.”

For-sale inventory fell to a supply of 3.2 months at the current sales pace in August, down from a revised 3.5 months in July and a revised 5.2 months in August 2011, C.A.R. said. A supply of six months is considered to be a “normal” market where buyer and seller demand is roughly equal. Last month, only homes selling for more than $1 million were in normal territory with a supply of 6.1 months. Homes under $300,000 had the lowest inventory, with a supply of 2.8 months.

home prices up in real estateIt took a median 41.1 days to sell a single-family home in August, down from 43.2 days in July and a revised 52.5 days a year ago.

The median price of an existing single-family home rose for the sixth straight month in August, up 15.5 percent year over year to $343,820. That’s a 3 percent increase from July, the largest annual price jump in more than two years, and the highest median since August 2008.

“The median price is gaining in part because of a shift in the mix of what is selling,” said CAR Chief Economist Leslie Appleton-Young in a statement. “The increasing share of sales in higher-priced coastal markets at the expense of the inventory-scare distressed markets has been the primary factor in fueling the statewide median price.”

Higher-priced markets with a “robust economy” are experiencing strong demand and posting double-digit year-over-year price increases, but sales were stagnant or declined in lower-priced markets that rely more on distressed properties, Appleton-Young said.

Sales of homes under $200,000 saw a 13.6 percent year-over-year decrease in August, while sales in every other price range rose. Homes above $500,000 saw the biggest jump, nearly 30 percent.

San Diego home prices increase

San Diego home prices are at 4-year high

“Home prices in San Diego County, still far from their pre-recession peaks, have risen to their highest level in four years, Tuesday’s DataQuick report shows. Home sales, which went through a five-month positive streak, have dropped.

The median price for all homes sold in July was $342,000. That’s the highest it’s been since August 2008, when the economy was in the dumps and the local median price was $350,000. The county peaked at $517,500 in November 2005.

July’s median price increased 1.9 percent from $335,500 recorded in June, and up 5.2 percent from the same time last year. Price boosts were most evident among condo resales. All five regions of the county saw price increases from a year ago. The hottest area was central San Diego, where the median price rose from $226,750 to $267,000, or nearly 18 percent.

The county recorded 3,565 sales in July, marking the first sales drop in five months. Transactions fell 5.1 percent from June, but they’re 17.2 percent higher than a year ago…”

Read the original article by Lily Leung at U~T San Diego here: “San Diego home prices are at 4-year high”.

San Diego foreclosures remain at 4-year low

The Union Tribune San Diego had a great article on the state of San Diego county foreclosures–they’re currently at a 4-year low! Read the article below:

The number of San Diego County foreclosures in March stayed at its lowest point in more than four years, essentially mirroring the downward trend seen statewide, based on Tuesday’s DataQuick foreclosure report. An improving picture in the distressed market could be attributed to some pick-up in the national economy and increasing number of homeowners who short-sell their homes instead of letting them fall into foreclosure.

A little more than 500 homes fell into foreclosure last month, the lowest it’s been since November 2007, when the county recorded 478. The March total is 21 percent lower than the previous month’s and more than half of what it was a year ago.

Statewide, foreclosures in the first quarter of 2012 fell to their lowest level since the third quarter of 2007, when 24,209 trustee deeds were filed. They peaked at 79,511 in 2008’s third quarter.

Local and statewide numbers for default notices, the official start of the formal foreclosure process, were mixed in March, DataQuick numbers show.

San Diego County recorded 1,500, 17.4 percent bump from February but an 18.3 percent drop from a year ago.

The number of default…

Read the rest of this article by U~T San Diego’s Lily Leung here: “San Diego foreclosures remain at 4-year low“.

Understanding Foreclosure

Understanding Foreclosure

It is an unfortunate commentary, but when economic activity declines and housing activity decreases, more real property enters the foreclosure process. High interest rates and creative financing arrangements also are contributing factors.

When prices are rapidly accelerating during a real estate “bonanza”, many people go to any lengths available to get into the market through investments in vacation homes, rental housing and “trading up” to more expensive properties. In some cases, this results in the taking on of high interest rate payments and second, third and even fourth deeds of trust. Many buyers anticipate that interest rates will drop and home prices will continue to escalate. Neither may occur, and borrowers may be faced with large “balloon” payments becoming due. When payments cannot be met, the foreclosure process looms on the horizon.

understanding foreclosuresIn the foreclosure process, one thing should be kept in mind: as a general rule, a lender would rather receive payments than receive a home due to a foreclosure. Lenders are not in the business of selling real estate and will often try to accommodate property owners who are having payment problems. The best plan is to contact the lender before payment problems arise. If monthly payments are too hefty, it may be that a lender will be able to make some alternative payment arrangements until the owner’s financial situation improves.

Let’s say, however, that a property owner has missed payments and has not made any alternate arrangements with the lender. In this case, the lender may decide to begin the foreclosure process. Under such circumstances, the lender, whether a bank, savings and loan or private party, will request that the trustee, often a title company, file a notice of default with the county recorder’s office. A copy of the notice is mailed to the property owner.

If the default is due to a balloon payment not being made when due, the lender can require full payment on the entire outstanding loan as the only way to cure the default. If the default is not cured, the lender may direct the trustee to sell the property at a public sale.

In cases of a public sale, a notice of sale must be published in a local newspaper and posted in a public place, usually the courthouse, for three consecutive weeks. Once the notice of sale has been recorded, the property owner has until 5 days prior to the published sale date to bring the loan current. If the owner cures the default by making up the payments, the deed of trust will be reinstated and regular monthly payments will continue as before. After this time, it may still be possible for the property owner to work out a postponement on the sale with the lender. However, if no postponement is reached, the property goes “on the block”. At the sale, buyers must pay the amount of their bid in cash, cashier’s check or other instrument acceptable to the trustee. A lender may “credit bid” up to the amount of the obligation being foreclosed upon.

With the recent attention given to foreclosure, there also has been corresponding interest in buying foreclosed properties. However, caveat emptor: buyer beware. Foreclosed properties are very likely to b e burdened with overdue taxes, liens and clouded titles. A buyer should do his homework and ask a local title company for information concerning these outstanding liens and encumbrances. Title insurance may or may not be available following a foreclosure sale and various exceptions may be included in any title insurance policy issued to a buyer of a foreclosed property.

This article is by California Title Company and Cam Hunter.

More questions? Need help with your property being foreclosed on?  Please, call me and let me help!

John A. Silva, Realtor

(619) 890-3648 | www.JohnASilva.com

Foreclosure backlogs persist

The improving job market and economy is helping push mortgage delinquencies and foreclosure starts down, but the percentage of loans in the foreclosure process remains stubbornly high, especially in states most affected by robo-signing issues, according to a quarterly survey of lenders by the Mortgage Bankers Association.

Since peaking at 10.1 percent in March 2010, the percentage of borrowers behind on their house payments has fallen to a seasonally adjusted 7.6 percent at the end of 2011 — about halfway to the pre-recession average of roughly 5 percent, said MBA Chief Economist Jay Brinkmann.

The percentage of loans entering the foreclosure process — which before the downturn averaged just under 0.5 percent — has also declined, from a peak of 1.4 percent at the end of third-quarter 2009 to 1 percent at the end of fourth-quarter 2011.

But at 4.4 percent, the percentage of loans in the foreclosure process at the end of 2011 was not far off the all-time high of 4.6 percent seen at the end of 2010. That compares to the long-term norm of roughly 1.2 percent.

Robo-signing issues — which lenders hope to put behind them this year as they implement recently announced settlement with state attorneys general — have created foreclosure backlogs.

While foreclosure starts are falling, it’s taking loan servicers longer to auction off or repossess homes once they enter the foreclosure process, particularly in states where courts oversee the process.

In “judicial foreclosure” states where courts handle most foreclosures, 6.8 percent of mortgages were in foreclosure at the end of 2011. In “nonjudicial” foreclosure states where most foreclosures are processed outside of the court system, loan servicers are clearing the backlog more quickly, and 2.8 percent of mortgages were in foreclosure.

The MBA survey covers 42.9 million loans on one- to four-unit residential properties, or about 88 percent of all first-lien mortgages. Extrapolating the survey’s results suggests that of the 48.75 million mortgages outstanding at the end of 2011, 2.13 million were in the foreclosure process.

Five states accounted for more than half of all loans in foreclosure — Florida, California, Illinois, New York and New Jersey. All but California are judicial foreclosure states.

The 10 states with the greatest percentage of mortgages in foreclosure were: Florida (14.27 percent), New Jersey (8.21 percent), Illinois (7.41 percent), Nevada (7.03 percent), Maine (5.92 percent), New York (5.88 percent), Connecticut (5.05 percent), Hawaii (4.97 percent), Ohio (4.94 percent), and Indiana (4.94 percent). All but Nevada are judicial foreclosure states.

The states with the lowest foreclosure rates were: Wyoming (1.03 percent), North Dakota (1.05 percent), Alaska (1.06 percent), Nebraska (1.55 percent), South Dakota (1.75 percent), Montana (1.76 percent), Texas (1.78 percent), Virginia (1.84 percent), Alabama (1.94 percent), and Arkansas (1.97 percent). Among those states, only North Dakota handles foreclosures judicially.

September 2011 Foreclosure Rate Heat Map

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