Tag Archives: home prices

Home Prices increase in San Diego County

Even though the real estate market for the nation as a whole has slowing home prices, San Diego County’s home prices are continuing to increase.

real estate home pricesStandard & Poor’s Case-Shiller Home Price Indices were released earlier this week, showing that in our county, home prices went up 0.8 percent in April 2014. And as of a year ago in April 2013, prices this April picked up 15.3 percent. Continue reading

Foreclosures drop in San Diego county

Foreclosures are low because of home price appreciation.

understanding foreclosuresAccording to U-T San Diego, “Large gains in annual home price appreciation have continued to help keep the number of foreclosures in San Diego County at pre-Great Recession levels.”

Per DataQuick, within the month of February 2014, 141 properties were repossessed by banks in San Diego county — which is down from the 252 foreclosures a year ago. It’s also the lowest amount of February foreclosures since 2006 (when only 40 properties were repossessed by banks). Continue reading

San Diego home prices up

housing market trend“San Diego County housing prices rose again in October, but the pace of growth continued to slow.

“The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index showed Tuesday that from September to October, the index grew 0.3 percent. That’s down from the 0.9 percent gain from August to September, and the 1.8 percent boost from July to August… Continue reading

Buyer demand continues into October

first-time-home-buyer

An analysis of listings data released by Realtor.com suggests that homes continued to turn over quickly in October, in defiance of seasonal patterns and in spite of price increases driven by inventory shortages in many markets.

The 1.9 million homes listed on realtor.com during October had been on the market for 94 days on average — up slightly from 93 days in September, but down 11.3 percent from a year ago, indicating demand for housing remains strong. Realtor.com rival Zillow reported a similar trend. Continue reading

Economists temper housing bubble worries

Although home prices are likely to continue to rise in the next few years, the national market is not in danger of a bubble, according to prominent economists.

“Four of the next five years are likely to be improving years in the housing market. I don’t say five because there’s always the possibility of little hiccups in the housing market,” said Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.

Continue reading

San Diego foreclosures at 6-year low

San Diego County closed out 2012 with foreclosures at their lowest level in six years, says a report released Wednesday from local real estate information company DataQuick.

foreclosuresThe consistent drop in the number of people losing their homes to bank repossessions appears to be a product of an economy on the mend, increasing home values and government-led deals with major banks that promise borrowers alternatives to foreclosure, DataQuick officials said.

December foreclosures plummeted to 355, the lowest level since December 2006, when 288 were recorded. December’s total is nearly 18 percent lower than November’s and half of December 2011’s.

Default notices, the first official filing in the foreclosure process, totaled 878. That’s up 7.2 percent from November but down nearly 30 percent from the same month a year ago…

Read the rest of this article by U-T San Diego here: “San Diego foreclosures at 6-year low”.

California home prices are at a 4-year high

Persistently declining for-sale home inventory helped push the median price of California homes up to its highest level in four years in August, according to a report by the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.

Closed sales of existing single-family homes in the Golden State also saw gains, rising 2.3 percent on an annual basis in August to a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 511,240 units. That’s a 3.4 percent decline from July, but the fifth straight month to see a year-over-year increase.

“A lack of inventory remains an issue, as the housing supply fell more than 30 percent from last year,” said LeFrancis Arnold, the Association’s president, in a statement.

“Inventory levels are at the lowest levels we’ve seen in seven years, and we are starting to see the supply shortage conditions having a negative impact on sales in the Central Valley and the Inland Empire, where REO (real estate owned) properties are in short supply.”

For-sale inventory fell to a supply of 3.2 months at the current sales pace in August, down from a revised 3.5 months in July and a revised 5.2 months in August 2011, C.A.R. said. A supply of six months is considered to be a “normal” market where buyer and seller demand is roughly equal. Last month, only homes selling for more than $1 million were in normal territory with a supply of 6.1 months. Homes under $300,000 had the lowest inventory, with a supply of 2.8 months.

home prices up in real estateIt took a median 41.1 days to sell a single-family home in August, down from 43.2 days in July and a revised 52.5 days a year ago.

The median price of an existing single-family home rose for the sixth straight month in August, up 15.5 percent year over year to $343,820. That’s a 3 percent increase from July, the largest annual price jump in more than two years, and the highest median since August 2008.

“The median price is gaining in part because of a shift in the mix of what is selling,” said CAR Chief Economist Leslie Appleton-Young in a statement. “The increasing share of sales in higher-priced coastal markets at the expense of the inventory-scare distressed markets has been the primary factor in fueling the statewide median price.”

Higher-priced markets with a “robust economy” are experiencing strong demand and posting double-digit year-over-year price increases, but sales were stagnant or declined in lower-priced markets that rely more on distressed properties, Appleton-Young said.

Sales of homes under $200,000 saw a 13.6 percent year-over-year decrease in August, while sales in every other price range rose. Homes above $500,000 saw the biggest jump, nearly 30 percent.

Eight things to know about buying a home today

Eight things to know about buying a home today

The home-sale market is showing signs of life. More buyers are confident now than they were a year ago that now might be a good time to buy. Interest rates are near all-time lows and home prices in some areas are back to 2002-2003 levels.

Some analysts are finally suggesting that we may be headed for recovery. If you have a secure job, plan to stay put and feel this is the right time for you to buy a home, consider the following.

In most places in the country, home prices are still declining. It has only been recently that the market picked up and it’s too soon to know if this will result in a sustainable increase in prices.

Job growth in some areas combined with low inventory of good homes for sale has resulted in multiple offers with buyers bidding the price up sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars over the asking price.

In other high-demand, low-inventory areas, buyers may find themselves in a bidding war. This doesn’t necessarily mean that the price will be bid up significantly over the asking price. This will vary from one listing to the next depending on property location, condition, and price.

It’s important to research the local community where you want to buy. Find out what homes are selling for, if multiple offers are common and if listings are selling for more than the asking price. This will help you make a realistic offer that might be accepted when you find a home you’d really like to buy. It helps to work with an experienced local real estate agent.

Some sellers in high-demand niche markets intentionally list their home at a low price hoping to stimulate multiple offers. If you see such a listing and there are a lot of buyers wanting to make offers, you will be better able to know how high your offer would need to be to win the contest if you have done your due diligence.

HOUSE HUNTING TIP: Whether you’re anticipating competition or not, you should be preapproved for the mortgage you’ll need to complete the purchase before you write an offer. In competition, this will make a big difference, particularly if everyone else who is offering is preapproved. It also lets you know what you can afford. And, it puts you in a good bargaining position with the seller.

Buyers aren’t the only participants in the housing market that have heard the news that the market has improved. Some sellers are putting their homes on the market because they’ve been waiting for a better time to sell. This is good news for buyers looking in low-inventory markets.

You should expect that you will have to negotiate. Many of today’s sellers are selling for less than they paid. Even though the market has improved a bit, sellers may be disappointed with the current market value of their home. Be prepared to negotiate, not just the initial price, but after inspections are completed if items come up that you hadn’t anticipated.

Include realistic contingency time frames in your purchase contract for loan and appraisal approval if you’re applying for a mortgage. The recent uptick in the market means that lenders are suddenly overwhelmed.

THE CLOSING: Underwriters could require that additional conditions be met before you can be approved. Act quickly to avoid further delay.

Dian Hymer is a real estate broker with more than 30 years’ experience and is a nationally syndicated real estate columnist and author.