Tag Archives: households

Money Monday: Multi-generational households

The multi-generational home is growing, and some make the choice to live with family for economical reasons.

multigenerationalAn August 2016 Pew Research report shows that “a record 60.6 million Americans — almost one in five – lived in multigenerational households in 2014, defined by Pew as a having two or more adult generations or grandparents and grandchildren. This is about a 30% increase in just seven years; in 2007 there were 46.5 million people living in multigen households…” (Forbes. “Multigenerational Living is Back and That’s a Good Thing”)

“…’The economic downturn in 2007 to 2009 may have driven families to come together under one roof out of need, but today this increasing multigen living is by choice,’ says Donna Butts, executive director of Generations United, a group dedicated to improving lives of children and older adults through intergenerational programs and services.” (Forbes. “Multigenerational Living is Back and That’s a Good Thing”)

Read more in Forbes’ article here: www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2016/10/09/multigenerational-living-is-back-and-thats-a-good-thing/?ss=personalfinance#2c8dc0cf5dac

Money Monday: Many full-time workers face housing affordability problems

Source: Harvard

While statistics on the gap in affordable housing clearly indicate the magnitude of the problem, they mask the extent of the difficulties that certain low-wage workers often face in obtaining a unit they can afford, particularly in major metro areas.

housing market

Making sense of the story

  • Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate that in many markets, most full-time cashiers, retail and sales persons, and food preparation workers would have been unable to afford even a modest one-bedroom apartment.
  • The fair market rent of a two-bedroom apartment was even further out of reach for these workers: as high as $2,062 in San Francisco and over $1,400 Washington, DC, Boston, New York, and Los Angeles.
  • Other occupations where median annual wages were inadequate for households to afford a
    modest one-bedroom apartment include—but are not limited to—EMTs and paramedics,
    childcare workers, security guards, and several types of healthcare support occupations.
  • All of these jobs are vital to local economies, and support a variety of businesses and services required for healthy, growing communities.
  • Wage stagnation among low-income households is certainly part of the problem. Between 2001 and 2014, the median real household income for renters in the bottom quintile fell 9.9 percent, while income for households in the top quintile was up 3.1 percent.
  • To make ends meet, many low-wage households must reduce expenditures on food and
    healthcare, move to areas which are less accessible and require longer commute times, or double up with family or roommates.
  • Nearly a third of the nation’s 7 million renters earning less than $35,000 in 2014 had minors
    living at home, and fully half of these families reported being severely cost-burdened in the same year—paying more than half of their incomes for housing.

Read the full story: housingperspectives.blogspot.com/2016/08/many-full-time-workers-face-housing.html

Money Monday: Challenges Hamper the Housing Recovery

As the Housing Recovery Strengthens, Affordability and Other
Challenges Remain: Harvard Study

Source: Harvard

The national housing market has now regained enough momentum to provide an engine of growth for the US economy, according to The State of the Nation’s Housing report released this week by Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies. However, several obstacles continue to hamper the housing recovery—in particular, the lingering pressures on homeownership, the eroding affordability of rental housing, and the growing concentration of poverty.for rent

Making sense of the story

  • On the renter side, the number of cost-burdened households rose by 3.6 million from 2008 to 2014, to 21.3 million. Even more troubling, the number with severe burdens (paying more than 50 percent of income for housing) jumped by 2.1 million to a record 11.4 million.
  • The national homeownership rate has been on an unprecedented 10-year downtrend, sliding to just 63.7 percent in 2015. Tight mortgage credit, the decade-long falloff in incomes that is only now ending, and a limited supply of homes for sale are all keeping households—especially first-time buyers—on the sidelines.
  • The report finds that income inequality increased over the past decade, with households earning under $25,000 accounting for nearly 45 percent of the net growth in US households in 2005–2015.
  • The report finds that rent burdens are increasingly common among moderate-income households, especially in the nation’s 10 highest-cost housing markets, where three-quarters of renters earning $30,000–45,000 and half of those earning $45,000–75,000 paid at least 30 percent of their incomes for housing in 2014.
  • Federal assistance reaches only a quarter of those who qualify, leaving nearly 14 million
    households to find housing in the private market where low-cost units are increasingly scarce.
  • Low-income households with cost burdens face higher rates of housing instability, more often settle for poor-quality housing, and have to sacrifice other needs—including basic nutrition, health, and safety—to pay for their housing.
  • The report notes that a lack of a strong federal response to the affordability crisis has left state and local governments struggling to expand rental assistance and promote construction of affordable housing in areas with access to better educational and employment opportunities.

Read the full story here. This concise intro to Harvard’s article is from the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS.

Foreclosure rates are dropping in California

California had the third biggest decrease among U.S. states in the number of homes in some stage of the foreclosure process, CoreLogic reported. As of February, 2.4 percent of the California homes with a mortgage, or about 160,000 households, faced the possibility of foreclosure.

That’s down 0.6 of a percentage point from January of last year, when 3 percent of homes were in the foreclosure process, CoreLogic reported.

CoreLogic’s February numbers showed also that:

  • 6.7 percent of the state’s mortgaged homes, or about 458,000 households, were 90 days or more late on their house payments. That’s down from 9 percent in February of last year.
  • Banks seized 154,212 homes through foreclosure in the 12 months ending in February.
  • Nationwide, banks seized 3.4 million homes through foreclosure during the past 3 ½ years – and 862,418 in the past year alone.
  • An additional 1.4 million U.S. homes, or 3.4 percent of all homes with a mortgage, were in the foreclosure process.
  • That’s down from 3.6 percent in February of last year, when 1.5 million U.S. households were in the foreclosure process.
  • The five states with the highest proportion of homes in the foreclosure process were Florida, 12 percent; New Jersey, 6.6 percent; Illinois, 5.4 percent; Nevada, 5 percent; and New York, 4.9 percent.
  • The five states with the lowest proportion in the foreclosure process were Wyoming, 0.7 percent; Alaska, 0.8 percent; North Dakota, 0.8 percent; Nebraska, 1 percent; and Montana, 1.4 percent.

“The overall foreclosure inventory is decreasing because sales (of bank-owned homes) were up in February,” said CoreLogic Chief Economist Mark Fleming. “With the spring buying season upon us, the inventory may decline further.” This article is from the OC Register: “Calif. foreclosure rates dropping“.

Mortgage aid open to more Calif. borrowers

A state-run program that helps homeowners struggling to pay their mortgages now has broader eligibility guidelines, opening up help to borrowers who did “cash-out” refinances and own multiple properties, said California Housing Finance Agency officials on Monday.

The mortgage-aid effort, called Keep Your Home California, so far has helped close to 8,000 low- and moderate-income households that are behind on loan payments or close to default, according to agency leaders.

Keep Your Home California“This expanded eligibility will allow more families to qualify and receive greater assistance,” said California Housing Finance Agency Executive Director Claudia Cappio, in a statement. “We are continuously evaluating our experience so far and making adjustments like these based on the initial results of the Keep Your Home California program.”

Keep Your Home California has four parts that include: mortgage help for the unemployed, mortgage aid for homeowners with documented financial hardship, relocation help for those in the midst of a short sale or deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, and reduction of principal. The programs, paid for by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Hardest Hit Fund, is costing taxpayers $2 billion.

Monday’s announced changes include:

–Allowing homeowners who completed “cash-out” mortgage refinancing to take part in the four programs. Such borrowers were excluded before.

–Allowing borrowers who own more than one property to apply. Program officials said this will be particularly helpful to those who co-signed on properties for family members.

–Offering mortgage aid to unemployed borrowers for nine months, instead of six. Such homeowners can get up to $3,000 a month. To qualify, you must receive unemployment benefits.

–Reinstating up to $20,000 in past-due mortgage payments instead of the previous $15,000 cap.

To qualify, your mortgage servicer must take part in Keep Your Home California. Click here for the list of servicers.

Info: Call 888-954-KEEP(5337) between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. Visit: www.KeepYourHomeCalifornia.org or www.ConservaTuCasaCalifornia.org.

This article is from SignOnSanDiego: “Mortgage Aid Open to More Calif. Borrowers.”