Tag Archives: housing

Home Buyers — Don’t Compromise on These Three Things

Unless you’re building, typically buyers won’t find their perfect home. Compromise is common and expected if you want to become a homeowner. But these three items are things where perhaps you shouldn’t budge from your ideal.

  • Layout
  • School district
  • Buying near neighboring houses that will lower your home’s value

This infographic is from CAR.org.

Money Monday: Multi-generational households

The multi-generational home is growing, and some make the choice to live with family for economical reasons.

multigenerationalAn August 2016 Pew Research report shows that “a record 60.6 million Americans — almost one in five – lived in multigenerational households in 2014, defined by Pew as a having two or more adult generations or grandparents and grandchildren. This is about a 30% increase in just seven years; in 2007 there were 46.5 million people living in multigen households…” (Forbes. “Multigenerational Living is Back and That’s a Good Thing”)

“…’The economic downturn in 2007 to 2009 may have driven families to come together under one roof out of need, but today this increasing multigen living is by choice,’ says Donna Butts, executive director of Generations United, a group dedicated to improving lives of children and older adults through intergenerational programs and services.” (Forbes. “Multigenerational Living is Back and That’s a Good Thing”)

Read more in Forbes’ article here: www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2016/10/09/multigenerational-living-is-back-and-thats-a-good-thing/?ss=personalfinance#2c8dc0cf5dac

Money Monday: Challenges Hamper the Housing Recovery

As the Housing Recovery Strengthens, Affordability and Other
Challenges Remain: Harvard Study

Source: Harvard

The national housing market has now regained enough momentum to provide an engine of growth for the US economy, according to The State of the Nation’s Housing report released this week by Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies. However, several obstacles continue to hamper the housing recovery—in particular, the lingering pressures on homeownership, the eroding affordability of rental housing, and the growing concentration of poverty.for rent

Making sense of the story

  • On the renter side, the number of cost-burdened households rose by 3.6 million from 2008 to 2014, to 21.3 million. Even more troubling, the number with severe burdens (paying more than 50 percent of income for housing) jumped by 2.1 million to a record 11.4 million.
  • The national homeownership rate has been on an unprecedented 10-year downtrend, sliding to just 63.7 percent in 2015. Tight mortgage credit, the decade-long falloff in incomes that is only now ending, and a limited supply of homes for sale are all keeping households—especially first-time buyers—on the sidelines.
  • The report finds that income inequality increased over the past decade, with households earning under $25,000 accounting for nearly 45 percent of the net growth in US households in 2005–2015.
  • The report finds that rent burdens are increasingly common among moderate-income households, especially in the nation’s 10 highest-cost housing markets, where three-quarters of renters earning $30,000–45,000 and half of those earning $45,000–75,000 paid at least 30 percent of their incomes for housing in 2014.
  • Federal assistance reaches only a quarter of those who qualify, leaving nearly 14 million
    households to find housing in the private market where low-cost units are increasingly scarce.
  • Low-income households with cost burdens face higher rates of housing instability, more often settle for poor-quality housing, and have to sacrifice other needs—including basic nutrition, health, and safety—to pay for their housing.
  • The report notes that a lack of a strong federal response to the affordability crisis has left state and local governments struggling to expand rental assistance and promote construction of affordable housing in areas with access to better educational and employment opportunities.

Read the full story here. This concise intro to Harvard’s article is from the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS.

What’s in a Name? Energy Efficiency in Real Estate

Energy-efficient real estate and housing is a top priority for consumers; buyers and builders just call it different things.

An energy-efficient home when buying or remodeling is a top priority for 50% of interviewed consumers, and thus home builders often cater to and strive to build those types of houses. But the consumer and the builder often use different terms to describe sustainable, green and environmentally friendly real estate.

environmentally friendly real estate

This infographic is from CAR.org.

What Boomers Want in Real Estate

Two-thirds of homeowners are over 55

That means that they have a large impact on housing for all generations.

WhatBoomersWantThis infographic is from CAR.org.

Money Monday: The housing affordability for good schools

For many in California, homes are not economically affordable in good-school areas.

“RealtyTrac analyzed school test scores for nearly 27,000 elementary schools in more than 7,200 U.S. zip codes, along with home price affordability in those same zip codes.” (RealtyTrac. http://www.realtytrac.com/news/home-prices-and-sales/realtytrac-2015-good-schools-and-affordable-homes/). Then they took a look at those zip codes with good schools; “‘good’ is defined as schools that post higher-than-average test scores for their given state” (http://money.cnn.com/2015/11/19/real_estate/neighborhoods-good-schools-affordable/index.html?section=money_realestate). In the 1,823 zip codes with at least one good school, they found that 65% (1,192 zip codes) were unaffordable for those with average incomes for the area, meaning that they would have to spend more than one-third of their income on housing.

For those in the San Diego – Carlsbad areas, the good school that RealtyTrac analyzed was Einstein Academy (with a 1.37 test score in 2014), and the relational zip code being 92102. At an average sales price of $320,000, homeowners spend an average of 40% of their income on housing.

San Diego Carlsbad sales price and test score

RealtyTrac’s Most Affordable Good-School Zips by Metro map, focused in on San Diego.

If you are interested in reading more on this, go to RealtyTrac’s article on the information they found here: www.realtytrac.com/news/home-prices-and-sales/realtytrac-2015-good-schools-and-affordable-homes.

U.S. New-Home Sizes Set Record Last Year

Home sizes keep on growing

homeThe median size of completed homes last year hit a new record of 2,415 square feet; in fact, home sizes grew in every year between 1995 and 2007, according to the Commerce Department. Home builders have been competing primarily for affluent buyers, and the rise in home size matches the tastes of this demographic. Case in point: builders sold slightly more homes priced above $400,000 than those priced below $200,000 for the first time ever last year.

Also, a new record was set when 4.8 percent of homes sold for at least $750,000 in 2014.
Read the full story from the Wall Street Journal: blogs.wsj.com/economics/2015/02/25/u-s-new-home-sizes-set-record-last-year/

San Diego real estate prices increase

Prices in the San Diego real estate market increase in January 2014

housing market trendAccording to the S&P/Case-Shiller index, the San Diego housing market had a price appreciation at the beginning of the year — which happens to be the biggest gain in any January since 2004.

From December 2013, prices overall increased 0.6 percent. For the nation, San Diego is the most improved area for year-over-year performance (20 U.S. cities were measured by the S&P index).  In San Diego, the January price average increased 19.4 percent from last year in the same month.                  

“Also noteworthy: The inventory of homes for sale in the county jumped 44 percent to 6,099 active listings, according to the San Diego Association of Realtors. However, that’s still below the 8,000 to 9,000 listings seen in more typical markets, and well below the 14,000 listings near the 2005 peak” (U-T San Diego, “Heat returns to San Diego housing market”).

Read more about San Diego’s current housing market in U-T San Diego’s article here.