Tag Archives: information

San Diego MLS fights for Zillow, Trulia exposure

 Agency wants agents’ info to be listed prominently on popular search sites

Article by U~T San Diego here: “San Diego MLS fights for Zillow, Trulia exposure“.  This story was updated Wednesday Feb. 8 with additional comments from a real estate syndicator and housing search sites.

Sandicor - MLSA debate over listing data continues between real estate brokers and websites like Zillow and Trulia as the San Diego region’s Multiple Listing Service seeks to control content to outside parties.

Sandicor, the county’s MLS, has added a text field to its listings that allows members to enter contact information, including names, email addresses and brokerage websites. The information, along with the usual listing data, would be disseminated by syndication websites such as ListHub and Point2, which are sources of information for popular real estate sites.

The main idea is that the contact information in the extra field would be displayed prominently for home hunters to see, nixing any confusion over the listing agent and an agent who is advertising on Trulia or Zillow.

The change, in the works since October, follows last week’s heated discussion after a San Diego brokerage cut ties with those two real estate behemoths.

“I think it will be clear to consumers if they want to contact the listing agent, they can,” Sandicor CEO Ray Ewing said. “If not, they can contact others who have ads around (the listings.) We give them the choice.”

Real estate brokers, who can opt-out of filling out the new field, also will benefit because the extra information will help drive traffic back to their websites, Ewing added.

It is believed Sandicor is the first MLS to make such a system change, Ewing said…

Want to read more about Sandicor’s latest change? Visit MLS Fights Back for Its Brokers, a blog from a real estate IT consulting firm.

Read more from this article by U~T San Diego here: “San Diego MLS fights for Zillow, Trulia exposure“. 

What do you think about this issue?  Obviously, this move to my local MLS, Sandicor, affects me–in that my listings have less visibility online.  But it does affect me on the flip side, with Zillow and Trulia not allowing my contact information to show up on my own listings.  

2011 had lowest mortgage rates on record

You’ve probably been hearing all year long how mortgage interest rates were at record lows.

Now, the final data is in. And it shows that 2011 had the lowest average interest rates in the 41 years that mortgage giant Freddie Mac has been tracking loan rates.

Specifically, the U.S. average was 4.45% on the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, Freddie Mac reported. That beats the previous low of 4.69% set in 2010.

The past two years are the only ones in Freddie Mac’s records in which the annual average rates were below 5% for a 30-year, fixed-rate loan. In 1981, 30-year mortgage rates averaged nearly 17%. As recently as 2008, rates were averaging above 6%.

Interest rates fell below 4% for the first time in Freddie Mac’s data in October – and stayed at or below 4% for the last nine weeks of the year. Thirty-year rates set six records last year, falling to an all-time low of 3.91% on Dec. 22.

Other types of mortgages were in record territory as well. According to Freddie Mac:

  • Fifteen-year, fixed-rate mortgages set eight records in 2011, falling to an all-time low of 3.21% on Dec. 15.
  • Five-year, adjustable-rate mortgages set nine records in 2011, falling to an all-time low of 2.85% on Dec. 22.
  • One-year, adjustable-rate mortgages set 14 records in 2011, falling to an all-time low of 2.77% on Dec. 22.

The record low mortgage rates failed to spark a revival in the housing market, with fewer buyers able to qualify for a loan or able to afford to purchase a home. Overall, local and U.S. home sales remain well below average levels.

This article is from the Orange County Register; read it here: 2011 had lowest mortgage rates on record.”

9 Reasons to be Optimistic About Housing

housing marketThere’s a lot of negative information and news about the real estate market, but not to worry–there is a brighter side to housing! In fact, there are nine reasons to be optimistic!

There’s been a lot of positive signs for a housing (and broader economic recovery) coming out lately. Here are nine reasons we might be looking at a better 2012 than 2011 in the residential construction market:

  1. Unemployment dropped to its lowest point since 20092. Pending home sales up 10.3 percent in October
  2. Pending sales up 10.2 percent in October
  3. Housing affordability at record levels
  4. Consumer confidence up heading into year-end
  5. Existing home sales make surprising October jump
  6. Residential construction spending up 3.4 percent
  7. Construction industry adds most jobs since 2006
  8. Builder confidence at 18-month high
  9. Single-family starts increased in October

Read the article in full at HousingZone.com: “9 Reasons to be Optimistic About Housing“.

CoreLogic Records First Drop in Home Prices in Four Months

Home prices in the U.S. slipped 0.4 percent between July and August, CoreLogic reported Thursday. It marks the first time in four months the company’s index has recorded a decline.

Mark Fleming, chief economist for CoreLogic points out that although the calendar says August, it traditionally marks the beginning of fall for the housing market and activity begins to slow down as winter approaches.

In light of that, Fleming says the slight month-over-month decline was predictable, particularly given the renewed concerns over a double-dip recession, high negative equity, and the persistent levels of shadow inventory.

Based on CoreLogic’s assessment, national home prices were down 4.4 percent in August when compared to a year earlier. This follows a decline of 4.8 percent in July 2011 compared to July 2010.

That figure includes distressed sales, such as short sales and REO transactions. Take the distress factor out, and prices are down by just 0.7 percent year-over-year.

According to Fleming, “The continued bright spot is the non-distressed segment of the market, which is only marginally lower than a year ago and continues to exhibit relative strength.”

Including distressed transactions, the peak-to-current change in CoreLogic’s national price index was -30.5 percent. That’s tracking price movement from April 2006 to August 2011.

Excluding distressed transactions, the peak-to-current change for the same period was -21.0 percent.

CoreLogic says the five states with the highest home price appreciation in August were: West Virginia (+8.6%), Wyoming (+3.6%), North Dakota (+3.5%), New York (+3.2%), and Alaska (+2.2%).

The five states with the greatest depreciation were: Nevada (-12.4%), Arizona (-10.7%), Illinois (-9.6%), Minnesota (-7.8%), and Georgia (-7.2%).

Carrie Bay | DSNews.com | October 6, 2011

Mortgage Modifications are a Mess

You have probably heard about the robo-signing fiasco and the fact that mortgage modifications are grinding to a standstill. We’re also seeing foreclosures occur after a modification has been approved–even occasionally when borrowers have the ability to make the payments. The whole process is a mess, and according to a top federal regulator, major U.S. banks are about to be penalized for “critical deficiencies” and shortcomings in their handlings of foreclosures.

One of the problems is that it is in loan servicers’ best interest to stall a foreclosure or modification.  This is because they can continue to charge fees while they’re servicing the loans. They charge fees for paying taxes, sending payments to the investors after receipt from borrower, maintaining records, etc.–and those “nickels and dimes” add up.

Having gone through the modification process firsthand, I can confirm that the process is daunting at best. The most painful part was when I had to pay 11% interest on my $400,000-first mortgage when the loan was adjusting at one point; only to have the bank tell me (on multiple occasions over a three-year period) that I either made too much money…or not enough. I went to court to stop a threatened foreclosure, but I still had to pay the ridiculous interest until my modification was approved.

While I won the victory of a modification, every situation is different. Like probably many of you, I’m still upside-down on the property, but at least I’ve lowered my payments while I await the market’s recovery.

In the interim, the Controller of the Currency and Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. has put sanctions on the banks, as I mentioned above, but the sanctions barely amount to a slap on the wrist. The reality is that the regulating agencies have a history of negatively impacting borrower’s rights rather than protecting them. So where does this leave you if you are fighting to keep your homes?

My personal experience has inspired me to grow my expertise in this area so that I can help others. No American should be subject to the whims of the system, and no American family should lose their home because of the negligent practices of a third party. If you need help fighting through the process, give me a call. I’ll stand by your side.

John A Silva
www.johnasilva.com
619-890-3648