Tag Archives: loan

Money Monday: Increase your credit score

Quick ways to up your credit score.

“Most people don’t put much thought into their credit scores until the time comes to apply for a loan. If you expect to need financing in the next few months and aren’t convinced your credit score is high enough to get you approved, you’ll need to act quickly to improve your chances. Thankfully, there are several things you can do to boost your credit score in record time.” (“4 tips to increase your credit score fast.” Maurie Backman. 8 May 2017. http://money.cnn.com/2017/05/08/pf/credit-score-tips/index.html?iid=Lead)

One way to increase your credit score? Ask for an increase in your credit limit. But read CNN’s article for more tips! 

Read all of CNN’s article on increasing your credit score here: “4 tips to increase your credit score fast.”

The Path to Buying a Home

The basic process on becoming a homeowner

find a home

While buying a home is, for most people, an important life goal; the path to owning a home is an unknown one for every first-time home-buyer. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Following are a few of the basics you should consider early in the home search/buying process–but be sure to check with your agent for more tips and advice on buying a home. Continue reading

Getting a mortgage after foreclosure

There are some additional hurdles for homeowners who have gone through a foreclosure, short sale or bankruptcy, but a little patience and some financial hard work will go a long way.

MortgagesBuying a home is a challenging goal for most hopeful homeowners. But for those who have experienced a bankruptcy, foreclosure or short sale, the hurdles are even higher.

Still, it’s not impossible to buy a home after financial difficulties, says Dan Keller, a mortgage banker with Hometown Lending in Everett, Wash. In fact, Keller says, people who have cleaned up their credit and are otherwise qualified to get a mortgage can buy a home as soon as they have outlasted a prescribed waiting period after the bankruptcy, foreclosure or short sale.

Wait a while
The waiting period can last one to seven years, says Kirk Chivas, chief operating officer at First Commerce Financial in Wixom, Mich. The one-year requirement applies to buyers who complete a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, have a spotless subsequent credit history and want to get a new loan insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The seven-year requirement applies to buyers who experienced a foreclosure and want to get a new conventional loan that can be sold to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.

In between are a number of two-, three- and four-year timelines based on similar criteria and other factors such as whether the buyer’s previous mortgage was current at the time of a short sale or the size of the buyer’s new down payment as a percentage of the home’s purchase price.

Generally speaking, the waiting periods after a bankruptcy tend to be more black and white while the waits after a foreclosure or short sale have more gray areas, Keller says. And in some cases, a waiting period can be waived or shortened if the buyer’s bankruptcy, foreclosure or short sale was due to extenuating circumstances or a hardship beyond his control.

Technically, it is possible for a buyer whose prior loan wasn’t in default at the time of a short sale to get a new FHA-insured loan with no waiting period, Chivas says. But he adds that he’s never encountered anyone in that situation.

Clean credit
Buyers must have very clean or perfect credit histories before they can buy homes after bankruptcy, foreclosure or short sale. A slip-up as small as one late credit card payment could disqualify a post-bankruptcy buyer from some loan programs, even if the waiting period has been completed, Keller says.

“Bankruptcy is a serious word,” he says. “If you do it, it’s a get-out-jail-free card. But once you get out of bankruptcy, you need to be flawless in your credit. Don’t even drop a gum wrapper.

Credit dings can be difficult to sort out for buyers who experienced a loan modification or short sale, in part because, as Chivas says, there’s “no consistency” in how lenders report those events to the credit bureaus. Buyers should review their credit reports and correct any errors or clarify the circumstances of adverse items.

Stable employment can be a plus, too, Keller says, noting that some loan programs are more lenient than others. “If there was a gap,” he says, “it needs to be explained.”

Consult a loan pro
Given these complexities, buyers are advised to consult a loan officer or mortgage broker early on for advice that applies to their situation.

“They may think they’re fine, but if they’re not talking to a professional, their hopes can get dashed or crushed,” Chivas says. “That’s why you want to speak to someone as soon as you start dreaming it up in your head” that you want to buy a home after a bankruptcy, foreclosure or short sale.

This article is by RealEstate.MSN.com, and is viewable here: “Getting a mortgage after foreclosure.”

Mortgage Modifications are a Mess

You have probably heard about the robo-signing fiasco and the fact that mortgage modifications are grinding to a standstill. We’re also seeing foreclosures occur after a modification has been approved–even occasionally when borrowers have the ability to make the payments. The whole process is a mess, and according to a top federal regulator, major U.S. banks are about to be penalized for “critical deficiencies” and shortcomings in their handlings of foreclosures.

One of the problems is that it is in loan servicers’ best interest to stall a foreclosure or modification.  This is because they can continue to charge fees while they’re servicing the loans. They charge fees for paying taxes, sending payments to the investors after receipt from borrower, maintaining records, etc.–and those “nickels and dimes” add up.

Having gone through the modification process firsthand, I can confirm that the process is daunting at best. The most painful part was when I had to pay 11% interest on my $400,000-first mortgage when the loan was adjusting at one point; only to have the bank tell me (on multiple occasions over a three-year period) that I either made too much money…or not enough. I went to court to stop a threatened foreclosure, but I still had to pay the ridiculous interest until my modification was approved.

While I won the victory of a modification, every situation is different. Like probably many of you, I’m still upside-down on the property, but at least I’ve lowered my payments while I await the market’s recovery.

In the interim, the Controller of the Currency and Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. has put sanctions on the banks, as I mentioned above, but the sanctions barely amount to a slap on the wrist. The reality is that the regulating agencies have a history of negatively impacting borrower’s rights rather than protecting them. So where does this leave you if you are fighting to keep your homes?

My personal experience has inspired me to grow my expertise in this area so that I can help others. No American should be subject to the whims of the system, and no American family should lose their home because of the negligent practices of a third party. If you need help fighting through the process, give me a call. I’ll stand by your side.

John A Silva
www.johnasilva.com
619-890-3648