Tag Archives: loans

Money Monday: the Equifax hack

Worried about the Equifax hack?

Equifax

“The names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and driver’s license numbers for 143 million people may have been accessed. That kind of information could be used by someone else to open bank accounts, credit cards and loans in your name.

“The credit card numbers of an additional 209,000 people were also accessed. Those people will be notified directly. Everyone else must go to a website created by Equifax and submit their last name and last six digits of their Social Security number to find out if they were affected.” (“5 things to do right now if you’re worried about the Equifax hack.” 10 Sept. 2017. CNN Money. http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/09/pf/what-to-do-equifax-hack/index.html?iid=SF_LN

If you’re worried, here are some things you can do right now:

  1. Check your free credit reports to see if anything shows up
  2. Put a fraud alert on your credit reports and credit cards
  3. Pay attention to your bank accounts and credit cards for any suspicious purchases or withdrawals

Read more of CNN’s suggestions here: “5 things to do right now if you’re worried about the Equifax hack.”

Money Monday: How to retire debt-free

Retiring already can put a strain on your budget; don’t exacerbate it by being deep in debt on top of it!

Picture from www.ccPixs.com

Here are a few ways to get and stay debt-free:

  1. Start and keep building up your savings — having at least an emergency savings stash is especially crucial.
  2. Spend less than you bring in — live below your means.
  3. Work on paying off your student loans early.
  4. Don’t overpay when buying your home — you need to get an affordable mortgage.
  5. Keep that credit card debt very low.

Read more on all five of these ideas on Money.CNN.com’s article: “5 steps to retire debt-free.”

Money Monday: Who’s checking your credit?

You may be surprised….

According to the Consumer Federation of America’ research, it’s not just creditors who are looking at your credit scores.

You may not realize this, but creditors are only required to inform consumers that their scores are being checked when consumers have one of the three happen:

  1. They apply for a mortgage
  2. When they haven’t received the best loan terms
  3. When they are denied a loan

Who else may be looking at your credit? 

  • Electric utility companies
  • Cell phone companies
  • Landlords
  • Home insurers

Who is checking your credit score

This infographic is from the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS at CAR.org.

Money Monday: Renters’ Dilemma

It can be tough to go from the role of renter to owner.

With good reason, for many. According to the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS, 46% of consumers are renting because they can’t buy. And 62% of renters have debt that makes buying a home difficult; because of: student loans, auto loans and credit cards.

But homeownership is still highly valued. Renters, on average, rate the value of being a homeowner at 6.8 stars out of 10.

TheRentersDilemma_lo

This infographic is from the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS: http://www.car.org/aboutus/onecoolthing/renters/

Money Monday: 5 things homebuyers need to do

If you’re looking to purchase a home in the near future, start planning now on what you need to do before actually looking for a home.

buyers and sellers real estate disclosures

There’s a lot on your to-do list when it comes time to buy a home, but you can avoid making some big mistakes and hurdles by realizing these five helpful pieces of information (tips from the Bankrate’s helpful article here: “5 first-time homebuyer mistakes“):

  • Realize that you’ll be paying more than just mortgage payments
  • Get loan preapproval before starting the house hunt
  • Get professional help from a real estate agent (In San Diego County and don’t have a Realtor? Call me at (619) 890-3648!), loan agent, and perhaps a lawyer)
  • Don’t use all your savings on the down payment
  • Wait until you’ve officially closed to make any other big purchases

Bankrate’s article is full of many more details and information on these tips, so click over to their website and read their article here: “5 first-time homebuyer mistakes“.

Money Monday: Buying a home without a 20% down payment 

Are you thinking of buying a home, but don’t have 20% of the purchase price for a downpaynent?

That doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re out of luck. 
  

With the national average listing price for a four-bedroom, two-bathroom home at $302,632, according to Coldwell Banker Real Estate, home buyers need to come up with $60,526 to put 20% down.

A recent article from Money.CNN.com has some helpful ideas for hopeful homebuyers:

1. Apply for an FHA loan. These require as little as 3.5% down. 

2. See what your options are through the government. 

“The Department of Veteran’s Affairs guarantees VA home loans with 0% down to former and current service members… 

“The Department of Agriculture has a home loan program to increase homeownership in more rural and less-populated areas…

“Many cities and municipalities offer down payment assistance programs to help potential buyers…”

3. Ask family members for a loan.

4. Get the money as a gift 

5. Use retirement funds 

Read CNN’s full post on this here: “How to buy a home without a 20% down payment“.

Money Monday: How the mortgage process just changed

It just got a little easier to navigate the complicated mortgage process.

New disclosure rules went into effect in the mortgage world Saturday that require lenders to provide home buyers two new forms that clearly detail their loan terms…

The rule, formally known as the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure rule, reduces what used to be four forms from two different government agencies to two forms: the Loan Estimate and Closing Disclosure.

Here’s what buyers can expect:

Comparing different loans

loan terms

Lenders have to provide potential home buyers a Loan Estimate form within three days of a submitted application.

The three-page form details the terms of a potential loan including: amount, interest rate and whether the figures can change after closing…

This article is from CNN Money. Read more at CNN Money here.

Distressed Borrowers Have Waiting Periods Reduced

Fannie Mae released a report this month, informing that there are simplified waiting periods for those distressed borrowers that have a prior derogatory credit event in their past, such as a: foreclosure, bankruptcy, preforeclosure sale (short sale), or deed-in-lieu of foreclosure.Fannie Mae waiting periods Continue reading