Tag Archives: properties

San Diego real estate prices increase

Prices in the San Diego real estate market increase in January 2014

housing market trendAccording to the S&P/Case-Shiller index, the San Diego housing market had a price appreciation at the beginning of the year — which happens to be the biggest gain in any January since 2004.

From December 2013, prices overall increased 0.6 percent. For the nation, San Diego is the most improved area for year-over-year performance (20 U.S. cities were measured by the S&P index).  In San Diego, the January price average increased 19.4 percent from last year in the same month.                  

“Also noteworthy: The inventory of homes for sale in the county jumped 44 percent to 6,099 active listings, according to the San Diego Association of Realtors. However, that’s still below the 8,000 to 9,000 listings seen in more typical markets, and well below the 14,000 listings near the 2005 peak” (U-T San Diego, “Heat returns to San Diego housing market”).

Read more about San Diego’s current housing market in U-T San Diego’s article here.

Buyer demand continues into October

first-time-home-buyer

An analysis of listings data released by Realtor.com suggests that homes continued to turn over quickly in October, in defiance of seasonal patterns and in spite of price increases driven by inventory shortages in many markets.

The 1.9 million homes listed on realtor.com during October had been on the market for 94 days on average — up slightly from 93 days in September, but down 11.3 percent from a year ago, indicating demand for housing remains strong. Realtor.com rival Zillow reported a similar trend. Continue reading

Become the Expert Clients Need

Serving you as my client is about creative problem solving! What’s your situation? I can help!

Because of my years of short sale experience, I had the honor of being featured in a recent National Association of Realtors’ article:

“Sure, being known as an expert can set you apart. But if you have to tell people you’re an expert, you probably aren’t one. Here are some tried-and-true tips for practitioners looking to gain the expert advantage…

John A. Silva, a sales associate with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties in La Mesa, Calif., became a short sale specialist to survive the down market when he entered the business in 1992.

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Five real estate tasks best done early

While I’m a big proponent of avoiding premature real estate moves, there are a number of tasks that are best done before you think they need to be. These are things that tend to take longer or often turn out to be more complex than people plan for.

Please, give me a call if I can help you in your home shopping process in any way! (619) 890-3648

1. Check your credit. Everyone knows that you should check your credit, or have your mortgage broker do it, some time before you get ready to start house hunting. What people fail to factor in are the real-life turnaround times on rehabbing your credit in the event there are errors, fraudulent entries, balances you need to bring down, or trade lines (credit accounts) you need to build up in order to qualify for a home loan.

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Five things to know about a home before committing to buy

Your due diligence inspections should include more than hiring a home inspector to look at the home and reviewing a current termite inspection. And your due diligence should start as soon as you have serious interest in a listing.

Making an offer to purchase a home consumes a lot of time and emotional energy. Before your real estate agent or attorney puts pen to paper, find out as much about the property as you can. In particular, you want to know if there’s any reason you shouldn’t try to buy the house.

Seller disclosure requirements vary from state to state, as does real estate practice and protocol. Find out if there are any seller disclosure statements and presale inspection reports. If there are, ask to see copies before you write an offer.
buy homeIn some areas, it is standard procedure for listing agents to provide a disclosure package that includes any existing reports and disclosures to interested buyers before they make an offer. In other areas, reports are made available only after the buyer and sellers have negotiated the purchase agreement. Get ahold of as much information as you can about the physical condition of the property as soon as possible.

After you review the seller’s documents on the property, you may discover that the home you find so appealing requires a far bigger investment in repair work than you can handle or afford financially. In this case, move on to the next property with no remorse. You’ve saved yourself from hassle and heartbreak.

On the other hand, if the reports and disclosures fall within your expectations, move on to investigating the local neighborhood. On closer look, you may discover that there are several large apartment buildings that back up to the house you’re interested in buying. This might create a noise factor. If you’re sensitive to noise, you might not be happy living in the property you’re considering.

Buyers sensitive to crime should check with the local police department to see if the neighborhood is being hit by waves of break-ins. Drive by the property several times during daylight and evening hours to see if the complexion of the neighborhood changes in any way that is disadvantageous to you.

Commuters should drive from the property to work and back during rush hour, and check into all the public transportation options that are available in close proximity. If you’re intent on buying within walking distance to shops and cafés, find out how long it takes to get from the house you think you want to the nearest commercial area.

HOUSE HUNTING TIP: It’s wise to include an inspection contingency in your purchase offer so that you have a time period to complete whatever inspections of the property you deem necessary before committing to move forward with the purchase. This is recommended even if the seller has completed presale inspections.

Some buyers who have confidence in the seller’s home inspector hire that inspector to do a walk-through inspection with them so that the inspector can explain his report and answer any questions. The fee for this sort of inspection will usually be less than what the seller paid for the initial inspection and written report.

Don’t skip inspections to save money. It could cost you plenty in the long run if uninspected items turn out to be faulty and you have to pay to repair them.

Order a home inspection as soon as possible after your offer is accepted by the sellers. Most home inspections include recommendations for further inspections. If you don’t have the home inspection done early, you may not have enough time to complete all the further recommendations recommended, like roof or drainage inspections.

THE CLOSING: If you run out of time, ask the sellers for an extension.

Dian Hymer is a real estate broker with more than 30 years’ experience and is a nationally syndicated real estate columnist and author.

Recently Sold Listings

just sold

 I’ve recently sold a number of listings in the San Diego county; representing either buyer, seller, or both parties in a transaction.

Please give me a call to get your house bought or sold–(619) 890-3648!

Home prices rise across county

Double-digit annual increases in many markets

While foreclosures continue to fall, the sales pace for the real estate market as a whole continues to heat up, and with it come rising prices.

Total sales in December were up 9 percent as compared to a year ago, and up 9.5 percent from even a month before, according to figures released this week by the California Association of Realtors, a real estate industry trade group. The Association’s chief economist, Leslie Appleton-Young, attributes the volume spike to sellers of high-priced homes trying to close transactions before becoming subject to higher capital gains taxes in the new year (profits of more than $250,000 for individuals and $500,000 for couples on the sale of personal residences are taxed as capital gains).

The median-priced home selling in San Diego County last month was $418,290, up from $403,990 in November and $359,930 in December 2011, marking a full 16.2% spike in prices over the last year.

Market tracking firm DataQuick points to several markets that have done even better. Though they’ve only released numbers through November 2012 at present, areas with a significant number of sales that have experienced even stronger appreciation include Encinitas (18.1%), La Jolla (30.8%), Lemon Grove (23.3%), and Vista (20.7%).

An inventory shortage present in the market for some time has become more pronounced, as underwater homeowners (those owing more than their homes are worth) are able to negotiate loan modifications with their lenders, decide to hold off selling in the hope that rising prices will eventually allow them to avoid the credit hit of a foreclosure, or simply elect not to pay or sell (it takes over 300 days on average for a lender to foreclose)…

Read the rest of this article by the San Diego Reader here: “Home prices rise across county”.

Three tips on listing low to get multiple offers

Three considerations before listing low to get multiple offers

Q: What happens when you start out listing your home at a low price to entice buyers and the first offer is full price but no other offers come in? Are you stuck selling at the lower price (at which you never actually intended to sell)?

A: With multiple offers on the comeback, many savvy sellers are pricing their homes on the low end with the intention to drive buyer interest and — fingers crossed — generate multiple offers. In markets where rising buyer activity and home values have already begun to decrease the inventory of available homes for sale, this strategy has been very effective. However, there is always the risk of precisely the problem you pose: What happens if you get only a single offer at the asking price?

Here are several pieces of advice for sellers who are worried about what happens when listing low doesn’t result in multiple offers:

1. Consider what the offer you get does and does not mean. You are never obligated to sell your home at a price you don’t want to, no matter how close the offer is to what you are asking for the property. I’ve actually seen a couple of situations in which sellers get a single full-price offer and reject it or issue a counteroffer, sometimes because they are in the situation you describe, and other times because it has come to their attention that they owe more on the home than they expected. (Don’t plan on doing this, though; it is a strategy with a high likelihood for disgusting a buyer and turning them all the way off.)

The reality is that, if you get only one offer at a given price, that may truly be the fair market value of your home even if you think you might have gotten a higher offer for the property had you asked for more. To live in that world of “what might have happened if” is to torture yourself with the impossibility of guessing at what a hypothetical situation would have turned out like. The real deal is that if you had asked for more, it’s possible you would have gotten more. It’s equally possible that the one buyer who did make an offer would never even have come to see the property.

2. Understand your listing agreement before you list it low. Under some listing agreements (your contract with the agent who lists your home for sale), a full-price, cash offer with no contingencies may obligate you to pay a commission even if “full price” is the discount price you set in an effort to get multiple offers. You can negotiate to change the default terms of your listing agreement, though, so that you are obligated to only pay a commission on a transaction that actually closes. You would need to do this before signing the agreement, and before the home goes on the market.

Get some legal advice from a local attorney if you don’t feel you completely understand the terms and implications of your listing agreement before you sign it and before you set the list price of your home.

3. Don’t list your home at a price you’d be upset to receive for it. The savvy sellers who list their homes on the low end to generate multiple offers are not listing their properties hundreds of thousands of dollars below their fair market value, or even making them the lowest-priced home in the neighborhood. Smart, aggressive pricing is listing a home at what seems like the low end of the range of comparable-supported prices or a slight discount from that — about a 2-5 percent discount, not 40 or 50, or 70 percent.

Many sellers are OK with taking the risk that their home might sell at 2 percent below the comparables as a trade-off for the opportunity to generate multiple offers and the possibility of receiving a premium sale price. And if you are a seller considering listing low, you should be aware of the potential trade-offs, and should make that decision only if you have market data to support the fact that this strategy makes sense in your local market.

To be crystal clear, as a seller, you should not list your home at a price you would be upset about receiving or unwilling to accept.

And remember that “listing it low” is a strategy that has proven to be successful for people specifically aiming to generate multiple offers in the many markets that currently support multiple offers. If your objective is simply to sell your home — period — in a down market, for example, then this may not be the route for you to take.

Every market is different, and every home and seller is different. If your market is still very soft or you don’t see any multiple offers happening in your town, you may not be able to generate loads of offers no matter what you price your home at. As always, work with your agent and take a long hard look at your local market dynamics before deciding on a pricing strategy.

Tara-Nicholle Nelson is an author and the Consumer Ambassador and Educator for real estate listings search site Trulia.com.