Tag Archives: RealtyTrac

Money Monday: The housing affordability for good schools

For many in California, homes are not economically affordable in good-school areas.

“RealtyTrac analyzed school test scores for nearly 27,000 elementary schools in more than 7,200 U.S. zip codes, along with home price affordability in those same zip codes.” (RealtyTrac. http://www.realtytrac.com/news/home-prices-and-sales/realtytrac-2015-good-schools-and-affordable-homes/). Then they took a look at those zip codes with good schools; “‘good’ is defined as schools that post higher-than-average test scores for their given state” (http://money.cnn.com/2015/11/19/real_estate/neighborhoods-good-schools-affordable/index.html?section=money_realestate). In the 1,823 zip codes with at least one good school, they found that 65% (1,192 zip codes) were unaffordable for those with average incomes for the area, meaning that they would have to spend more than one-third of their income on housing.

For those in the San Diego – Carlsbad areas, the good school that RealtyTrac analyzed was Einstein Academy (with a 1.37 test score in 2014), and the relational zip code being 92102. At an average sales price of $320,000, homeowners spend an average of 40% of their income on housing.

San Diego Carlsbad sales price and test score

RealtyTrac’s Most Affordable Good-School Zips by Metro map, focused in on San Diego.

If you are interested in reading more on this, go to RealtyTrac’s article on the information they found here: www.realtytrac.com/news/home-prices-and-sales/realtytrac-2015-good-schools-and-affordable-homes.

Buyer demand continues into October

first-time-home-buyer

An analysis of listings data released by Realtor.com suggests that homes continued to turn over quickly in October, in defiance of seasonal patterns and in spite of price increases driven by inventory shortages in many markets.

The 1.9 million homes listed on realtor.com during October had been on the market for 94 days on average — up slightly from 93 days in September, but down 11.3 percent from a year ago, indicating demand for housing remains strong. Realtor.com rival Zillow reported a similar trend. Continue reading

Mortgage defaults in San Diego keep dipping

“Mortgage defaults in San Diego County continued to dip in November, helping the local market maintain a more than six-year low and keeping at bay the theory of another foreclosure surge, figures say. Foreclosures also fell last month.

The county racked up 819 notices of default last month, an almost 15 percent drop from October and a 50 percent drop from the same month a year ago, says a Tuesday report from local real estate tracker DataQuick.

Notices of default mark the first official step in the foreclosure process but not all of such cases necessarily result in foreclosures. Homeowners can avert foreclosure through a number of means, including getting a loan modification or completing a short sale, a deal in which they sell their homes for less than what they owe as long as the lender gives an OK.

November’s default tally is the lowest for the county since August 2006, when 794 defaults were recorded. They peaked at 3,832 in March 2009…”

Read the rest of SignonSanDiego.com’s article here: “Mortgage defaults in San Diego keep dipping”

2012 could be record year for short sales

2012 is on track to become a record year for short sales, according to a report from foreclosure data aggregator RealtyTrac.

Sales of U.S. homes in the foreclosure process, typically short sales, rose 33 percent year over year, to 35,000, in January. A total of 32 states saw annual increases in short sales, and 12 states saw more short sales than REO (real estate owned) sales.

The short-sale increase comes after three years of declines following the inauguration of “a new presidential administration with a new approach to the foreclosure problem,” wrote Daren Blomquist, RealtyTrac’s vice president and author of the report.

“Short sales have long held great promise as a market-based solution to the nation’s foreclosure problem, but short sales transactions over the past three years have actually declined after peaking in the first quarter of 2009,” Blomquist said in a statement.

“January foreclosure sales numbers, along with first-quarter foreclosure activity, strongly indicate that downward trend is ending, and we believe 2012 could be a record year for short sales.”

Several states saw triple- or double-digit yearly jumps in short sales in January, including Georgia (up 113 percent), Michigan (90 percent), California (52 percent), Texas (48 percent), Arizona (44 percent), Nevada (36 percent), and Florida (20 percent).

Although REOs continue to outnumber short sales nationwide, there were only 2,600 more REO sales than short sales in January. Nearly a quarter of states had more short sales than REO sales, including Utah, California, Arizona, Florida, Indiana, Colorado, New York and New Jersey, according to the report.

Six out of the 10 states with the highest share of short sales in January were in the West.

Of the 50 largest U.S. metro areas, nine out of the 10 metros with the highest share of short sales in January were in the West, six of them in California.

Even as short sales increase, the prices buyers pay for them have decreased. In fourth-quarter 2011, a pre-foreclosure property sold for an average $184,221, down 11.3 percent from fourth-quarter 2010. In January, such a property sold for $174,120, down 10 percent year over year.

Short sales are also selling for bigger discounts when compared to the average sales prices of nondistressed homes. Short-sale buyers received an average 21 percent discount in January, up from an average discount of 17 percent the year before. RealtyTrac does not take into account property condition or size when calculating discounts for distressed properties.

Short sales in Massachusetts, Missouri and California saw the biggest discounts in January.

Short-sale timelines appear to be getting shorter. After peaking at 318 days in third-quarter 2011, the average number of days it took for a property to go from the start of the foreclosure process to its sale as a pre-foreclosure was 306 days in the first quarter, slightly down from 308 days in the fourth quarter.’

Although foreclosure starts — either default notices or scheduled foreclosure auctions, depending on the state — were down 11 percent from the previous year in March, last month also saw the third straight monthly rise in foreclosure starts.

There are nearly 3.5 million delinquent borrowers nationwide; 41 percent of those borrowers are seriously delinquent and therefore at high risk for entering the foreclosure process and becoming short sales, RealtyTrac said.

Another, bigger potential pool of short-sellers are borrowers with underwater mortgages. More than 12.5 million borrowers owe at least 25 percent more on their mortgage than their home is worth.

“Even if these homeowners aren’t struggling to make mortgage payments and therefore are at low risk for foreclosure, if they need to sell sometime in the next five years it’s likely they’ll need to sell via short sale,” the report said.

Among lenders and loan servicers, Bank of America had the highest short-sale volume in January, followed by Chase and Wells Fargo.

PNC Financial saw the biggest annual jump in short sales, followed by the Federal Housing Administration, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac combined.

Those three government-backed entities also had the lowest average short-sale prices in January, the biggest declines in average sales price for short sales, the lowest number of average days to sale, and the biggest decrease in time to sell.

San Deigo foreclosures decreased in February

The number of San Diego County homes that were foreclosed upon in February fell to its lowest level in more than four years, while mortgage defaults remain higher than the pre-recession norm, Wednesday’s DataQuick report shows.

The county recorded 634 foreclosures in February, the lowest it’s been since November 2007. The latest tally of foreclosures is 12.7 percent lower than in January and 29.2 percent lower than a year ago. Foreclosures peaked at 2,004 in July 2008.

Notices of default — the first formal step in the foreclosure process — totaled 1,278, down 9.2 percent from January and down 6.9 percent from a year ago. Mortgage defaults peaked at 3,832 in March 2009.

Monthly and year-over-year changes in both indicators are constantly volatile because they’re heavily dependent on lender activity.

By comparing current foreclosure and mortgage-default figures to 1-year to 5-year averages, we can see decreases across the board…

Read the rest of this article by U~T San Diego here: “San Diego foreclosures fall in February.”

Moderate Growth Projected for 2012

Overall, growth is expected to continue for the year, but at a modest rate, according to the Fannie Mae February 2012 Economic Outlook report.

Economic growth is projected to be at 2.3 percent for 2012, an increase compared to 1.6 percent last year, according to the report.

For the first time in seven years, the housing market is projected to contribute to gross domestic product (GDP), the report also stated, but by a very modest amount.

“Risks to the forecast are more balanced between the upside and downside since our January forecast,” said Fannie Mae chief economist Doug Duncan. “The economy appears to be more resilient than in previous months, and should be less vulnerable to shocks, including any spillover from the European sovereign debt crisis”…

Read the rest of this article (and photo) by DSNews.com here: “Moderate Growth Projected for 2012.”

REO Inventory in 2011

RealtyTrac’s year-end report released Thursday shows foreclosure filings – including default, auction, and bank repossession notices – were reported on 1,887,777 U.S. properties in 2011. Of that total, 804,423 homes were taken back by lenders as REO.

Last year’s tally of nearly 1.9 million properties with a foreclosure filing seems staggering, but it’s actually the lowest reported since 2007. It’s 34 percent below 2010, 33 percent below 2009, and 19 percent below the 2008 total.

RealtyTrac’s newly appointed CEO Brandon Moore describes foreclosure activity last year as being in “full delay mode.”

“The lack of clarity regarding many of the documentation and legal issues plaguing the foreclosure industry means that we are continuing to see a highly dysfunctional foreclosure process that is inefficiently dealing with delinquent mortgages – particularly in states with a judicial foreclosure process,” Moore said.

These delays, however, may be coming to an end. Moore says there were strong signs in the second half of 2011 that indicate lenders are finally beginning to push stalled foreclosures through in select local markets.

“We expect that trend to continue this year, boosting foreclosure activity for 2012 higher than it was in 2011, though still below the peak of 2010,” Moore said.

Despite signs that some markets are experiencing a pickup in foreclosures, RealtyTrac’s analysis shows that processing timelines continued to increase.

On the national stage, properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter took an average of 348 days to complete the process, up from 336 days in the third quarter and up from 305 days in the fourth quarter of 2010.

RealtyTrac says the length of the average foreclosure process has increased 24 percent from the third quarter of 2010, when lenders began to re-evaluate foreclosure procedures as a result of documentation and affidavit errors.

New York holds the title of ‘longest foreclosure process in the nation’ – an average of 1,019 days.

New Jersey documented the nation’s second longest end-to-end foreclosure process, at 964 days. Florida has the third longest at 806 days. Foreclosure activity in both these states dropped more than 60 percent from 2010 to 2011.

All three states with the longest foreclosure timelines employ the judicial foreclosure process.

Texas continues to register the shortest average foreclosure process of any state, at 90 days, but that still represents an increase from 86 days in the third quarter and 81 days in the fourth quarter of 2010.

At 106 days, Delaware has the second shortest foreclosure timeline in the nation, and Kentucky lays claim to the third shortest, at 108 days.

More than 6 percent of Nevada housing units (one in 16) had at least one foreclosure filing in 2011, giving it the nation’s highest state foreclosure rate for the fifth consecutive year. That’s despite a 31 percent decrease in foreclosure activity from 2010.

Arizona registered the nation’s second highest foreclosure rate for the third year in a row, with 4.14 percent of its homes (one in 24) receiving at least one filing in 2011.

California registered the nation’s third highest foreclosure rate for all of 2011, with 3.19 percent (one in every 31 homes).

Other states with 2011 foreclosure rates ranking among the nation’s 10 highest include: Georgia (2.71 percent), Utah (2.32 percent), Michigan (2.21 percent), Florida (2.06 percent), Illinois (1.95 percent), Colorado (1.78 percent), and Idaho (1.77 percent).

This article is by DSNews.com: “New REO Inventory in 2011=804,423 Homes.”

Short Sales Offer Significant Discounts in Several Major Cities

Short sales are growing throughout the nation as distressed homeowners and servicers continue to seek alternatives to foreclosure and home buyers increasingly opt for the significant discounts that come with short sales.

short salesWith 9,145 completed short sales, the Los Angeles area had more short sale transactions than any other metropolitan statistical area (MSA) in the second quarter of this year, according to a recent blog post from RealtyTrac.

These short sales came with an average discount of 32 percent and at an average price of $350,237.

Phoenix ranked second in number of short sales for the second quarter with 8,434 short sales, which came with an average discount of 27 percent and an average price of $133,793.

According to the RealtyTrac blog post, the metros with the highest numbers of short sales in the second quarter were:

1. Los Angeles
2. Phoenix
3. Cape Coral – Fort Myers, Florida
4. Oxnard – Thousand Oaks – Ventura, California
5. Reno – Sparks, Nevada
6. San Francisco
7. San Jose
8. Portland
9. Atlanta
10. Milwaukee

Short sale savings averaged more than 30 percent in Cape Coral – Fort Myers, Florida; San Francisco; San Jose; and Milwaukee.

Reno – Sparks, Nevada, experienced a 50 percent rise in short sales from the first quarter to the second quarter of the year, while San Francisco saw a 47 percent rise in short sales.

Atlanta and Milwaukee also saw significant increases in short sales over the quarter – 21 percent and 20 percent respectively.