Tag Archives: recession

Is the San Diego real estate market heating up?

Is the spring homebuying season heating up?

Last month, San Diego County saw its highest home-sale count for a March month since 2006 as it entered another spring home-buying season, Tuesday’s numbers from DataQuick show.

A total of 3,237 homes were sold in March, up 19.5 percent from February and up nearly 6 percent from a year ago. Big percentage bumps are natural from February to March throughout Southern California, historical records show, but it appears this is the best March San Diego County has seen in six years, when a total of 4,367 homes were sold.

Improvement aside, sales are still far below from pre-recession levels. The current housing cycle’s peak was 6,926 transactions in June 2004.

“The year is young and lots could still change,” said DataQuick John Walsh in the company’s latest Southern California report. “But the results from the first big sales month of 2012 suggest the market is stuck in low gear. This remains a very gradual – not to mention fragile – recovery.”

Sales saw the most oomph in the markets of single-family resales and new properties, in which tallies increased almost 10 percent and 27 percent, respectively, from a year ago. However, both submarkets saw their values in March fall from a year ago. Prices for single-family resales dropped 4.2 percent to $350,000, and almost 26 percent to $392,000 in the new-home market…

Read the rest of this article by U~T San Diego’s Lily Leung here: “Is the spring homebuying season heating up?

 

From Bad to Good-Unbelievable Results in a Short Sale!!

From Bad to Good-Unbelievable Results in a Short Sale!!

In a volatile economy with a recession in full swing, it is extremely hard for most people to imagine anything positive to happen in a bad situation. Well, with an upside down property and several liens in place, you would want to pay close attention in this article because you will find this SHOCKING!!

I just recently closed a short sale with numerous liens on the property, specifically IRS lien, child support lien, large past due HOA lien, and an active bankruptcy in place. This example is one of huge importance for the fact that the bank contributed to some of these debts despite the fact that the property had no equity. This is FREE money towards the owner’s debts. In addition, the owner of the property received bad advice before I talked to him to move out of the property and by doing so, gave up the qualifying right to receive several thousand dollars for moving and relocation expenses from the bank. This aside, the situation was still a win-win for the owner regarding getting free money from the bank to go towards debt that most likely would have to be paid through his bankruptcy Chapter 13 reorganization plan.

I have personally closed several short sale transactions with an active bankruptcy or shortly after discharge. This process is extremely valuable and very rare for any real estate agents to understand including process with these circumstances.

Another transaction I closed as a short sale in the past had 8 liens where the benefit of this one went completely to the debtor’s children in this case a child support lien in the amount of $24K and a settlement by the 1st lien holder bank paid of $12K! This is free money from the 1st Trust Deed Holder for a situation that was beyond out of control. Most of the other liens also received free money from the lien holder or were released with zero money to them.

Another transaction had liens on an upside down property from credit cards that were settled by negotiation and allowed by the lien holder. Again this is free money from a no equity sale or short sale that pays down a debt or settles them in full and in some cases I have done these has helped avoid a bankruptcy by the seller.

There are many people in situations as I mentioned above and there are literally no Real Estate Agents that know how or want to handle these situations. If you know someone with a similar situation, you will be a huge benefit to them and do a bigger charitable act by referring me to them for a no obligation, private and discreet consultation. CALL NOW! ONLY THE BEST GET THE BEST RESULTS!!

– John A. Silva

www.JohnASilva.com | (

What’s in store for the housing market in 2012?

2011 was supposed to ratchet up steady, if not, robust growth in the US economy. However, several economic and geo-political events tripped up the economy during the year that have left would be home buyers dazed and confused about jumping into the housing market.
2011: A Year of Wild CardsLooking in the rearview mirror: 2011

Here’s what we know–2011 has been wrought with uncertainty and unexpected shocks that has hobbled output in the US and around the globe and caused a huge crisis of confidence for consumers, investors, and businesses alike. The list of wildcards is long: the DC midterm elections, the change of power in the House, the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the Arab uprising, the oil price shocks, the European debt crisis, the battle over debt ceiling, the downgrading of the US long-term debt, and the fallout with the volatility in the stock market. All of which have left output through the first half of the year below the growth rates that accompany a recovery. The probability of a double-dip recession has gone up and has caused economists far and wide to downgrade their outlook for this year and next.

What does next year have in store for housing?

California Housing Market OutlookHere is what C.A.R. is forecasting for 2012:
  • While the probability for a double-dip recession is higher, the most likely scenario is for a continuation of the slow-moderate growth we have seen for the last few years. The outlook is for modest but positive growth with GDP coming in at 1.7% in 2011, 2.0% in 2012.
  • We are moving forward, albeit bouncing along the bottom for most of 2011 and we can expect the same for next year, with a flat sales forecast for 2011/2012 (-0.1% year-to-year loss in 2011 and 1.0% gain in 2012).
  • Prices are expected to come in 4% below 2010 levels and should show a modest gain in 2012 (+1.7% year-over-year).

Overall, we’ve seen uncertainty and a lack of urgency put a damper on the housing market in 2011.

Hopefully, 2012 will prove less uncertain and could even show signs of urgency as current prices and mortgage rates are phenomenal and will not stay this low forever.

Five bright spots in the real estate recession

The real estate market meltdown was much more severe and has lasted much longer than even the most bearish housing market observer would ever have predicted. Rather than values taking a dip, they’ve taken a double dip in many places; and the housing sector drama has infected the job market and the entire world’s economy.

Yet, there are some very shiny silver linings to this whole mess — a handful of ways in which our mindsets, habits, behaviors and approaches to money, mortgage and even life decision-making — have been changed by this real estate market debacle. As I see it, here are the five best things about this housing recession:

1. People now buy for the long term

Even Jeff Lewis, that reality TV house flipper extraordinaire, has declared that he’s tapped out of the flipping business for the foreseeable future, trading in his real estate wheeling and dealing for the design business.

Recently, he mentioned having lost six homes in the real estate market crash.

While Lewis flipped homes as his business, just five years ago, many Americans — homeowners and investors alike — took a short-term view on their homes, buying them with the idea that they could count on refinancing, pulling cash out or even reselling them anytime they wanted, at a profit.
Reality check — those days are gone. Now, buyers know they’d better be prepared to stay put for somewhere between seven and 10 years (shorter in strong local markets, longer in foreclosure hot spots) before they buy if they want to break even. And this is causing them to take mortgages they can afford over time, and make smarter, longer-term choices about the homes they buy.

2. Dysfunctional properties are being weeded out and creatively reused

real estate market recessionMunicipalities like Detroit and Cleveland are demolishing blighted and decrepit properties in dead neighborhoods en masse, intentionally shrinking their cities to match their shrinking populations. These efforts are also eliminating breeding grounds for crime, and focusing resources on the neighborhoods that have a better chance of surviving and thriving in the long term.

In the so-called “slumburbias” of central California, Nevada and Arizona, McMansions are being repurposed into affordable housing for groups of seniors, artist communities and group homes.

3. American housing stock is getting an energy-efficient upgrade

The news would have you believe that every American has lost his or her home, walked away from it, or is now renting by choice. In fact, the vast majority of homeowners have simply decided to stay put.

Instead of selling and moving on up, homeowners are improving the homes they now plan to stay in for a long(er) haul. And this generation of remodeling is focused less on granite and stainless steel, and more on lowering the costs of “operating” the home and taking advantage of tax credits for installing energy-efficient doors, windows, water heaters and more. And while the first-time homebuyer tax credit is a thing of the past, the homeowner tax credits for energy-optimizing upgrades are in effect until the end of this year.

4. People are making more responsible mortgage decisions, and building financial good habits in the process

Buyers are buying far below the maximum purchase prices for which they are approved. They are reading their loan disclosures and documents before they sign them. And, thanks to the stingy mortgage market, they are spending months, even years, in the planning and preparation phases before they buy: paying down their debt; saving up for a down payment (and a cash cushion, so that a job loss wouldn’t be disastrous); being responsible and sparing in their use of credit to optimize their FICO scores; and creating strong financial habits in one fell swoop.

5. Our feelings about debt and equity have been reformed

Americans no longer use their homes like ATMs, to pull out cash, pay off their credit cards and then start the whole overspending cycle over again. Many can’t, because their homes are upside down and cannot be refinanced in any event — much less to pull cash out.

Others have been reality-checked by the recession, and are dealing with their non-mortgage debt the old fashioned way: by ceasing the pattern of spending more than they make, and applying the self-discipline it takes to pay their bills off.

Home equity, in general, is no longer viewed as an inexhaustible source of cash. Rather, we see it as a fluctuating asset to be protected and increased — not so much through the vagaries of the market, but through the hard work of paying the principal balance down. Many of those refinancing into today’s lower rates aren’t doing it to pull cash out, as was the norm at the top of the market; instead, they are refinancing into 15-year loans to pay their homes off sooner than planned, or reducing their required payment so their extra savings can be applied to principal.

Of course, it remains to be seen how lasting these changes will be if and when home prices go up and mortgage guidelines loosen up. But since neither of these things look likely to happen in the short term, hopefully there’s a chance that these behavior shifts will become part of a permanent mindset reset for American housing consumers.

Tara-Nicholle Nelson is an author and the Consumer Ambassador and Educator for real estate listings search site Trulia.com. ClientDirect.net.