Tag Archives: short sale

Distressed Borrowers Have Waiting Periods Reduced

Fannie Mae released a report this month, informing that there are simplified waiting periods for those distressed borrowers that have a prior derogatory credit event in their past, such as a: foreclosure, bankruptcy, preforeclosure sale (short sale), or deed-in-lieu of foreclosure.Fannie Mae waiting periods Continue reading

Foreclosures drop in San Diego county

Foreclosures are low because of home price appreciation.

understanding foreclosuresAccording to U-T San Diego, “Large gains in annual home price appreciation have continued to help keep the number of foreclosures in San Diego County at pre-Great Recession levels.”

Per DataQuick, within the month of February 2014, 141 properties were repossessed by banks in San Diego county — which is down from the 252 foreclosures a year ago. It’s also the lowest amount of February foreclosures since 2006 (when only 40 properties were repossessed by banks). Continue reading

Just Listed: 211 River Park Dr. #30, Santee

Just Listed

211 River Park Dr. | Santee, CA

Offered at $275,000 – $310,876

Outstanding opportunity ready for your personal touch; Newer Construction Townhome in Great Area Near: Community Park, Target, Home Depot, Costco, and Lowes, Restaraunts, etc. A smaller well cared for complex has never raised HOA fees. This rarely available End Unit has it all: 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths- 2 full upstairs, 1/2 bath downstairs with big laundry room & attached large 2 car garage with inside garage access to the home. Central Forced Air & Heat & Efficient Kitchen with Breakfast Bar. Short Sale

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BofA Tests an Option to Foreclosure

Bank of America Corp.is launching a pilot program that will allow homeowners at risk of foreclosure to hand over deeds to their houses and sign leases that will let them rent the houses back from the bank at a market rate.

While the initial scope of the “Mortgage to Lease” program is small—the bank began sending letters Thursday offering leases to 1,000 homeowners in Arizona, Nevada and New York—it represents a big change in the way banks deal with borrowers who can’t afford their mortgages.

Until now, banks have focused the bulk of their borrower outreach on modifying mortgages, usually by reducing the monthly payments. When that doesn’t work, most foreclosure alternatives require homeowners to leave their house, typically through a short sale, in which the bank approves the sale for less than the amount owed. Banks often insert clauses forbidding the new owner from renting the property back to the former owner.

The new approach is unlikely to be expanded unless banks conclude that avoiding eviction reduces costs associated with taking back, maintaining and reselling properties. If a significant number of borrowers are willing and able to rent the homes, Bank of America could ultimately sell the properties to investors that agree to keep them as rentals.

Already, in a growing number of housing markets, investors are buying foreclosures and converting them into rentals, often filling them with families that have gone through foreclosure.

Executives last year began to ask themselves “isn’t there a way to sort of combine that whole process and

keep the borrower in the property? It’s just better for the market,” said Ron Sturzenegger, the Bank of America executive who last summer was put in charge of the unit that handles troubled mortgages.

[BANKRENT]

Bank of America became the nation’s largest mortgage originator after its 2008 purchase of Countrywide Financial Corp., but over the past year it has retreated from the mortgage market. The initial pilot is limited to loans that Bank of America holds on its books. Homeowners can’t apply for the program—only those who receive letters from the bank can participate.

Borrowers would agree to a what is known as a “deed-in-lieu” of foreclosure, where they essentially sign over ownership of the property to the lender. This is less costly to the bank and also does less damage to a borrower’s credit than a foreclosure.

Borrowers selected for the program must be at least two months past due on their mortgage and face considerable risk of foreclosure.

In exchange…

Read the rest of this article by the Wall Street Journal here: “Alternative to Foreclosure Tested“.

Top six reasons mortgage applications are rejected

Half of refinance applications are abandoned or rejected, as are 30 percent of purchase mortgage applications, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. All told, the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) says that well over 2 million mortgage applications were rejected last year.

Want to avoid falling into that number? It’s tough — especially in light of the fact that mortgage lenders have become increasingly restrictive in terms of their lending guidelines since the housing market crash.

Here, as a cautionary tale and primer on what to expect, are the top six reasons mortgage lenders reject applications.FFIEC

1. Income issues. Most failed applications falling into this category have income too low for the mortgage amount they are seeking; often, a spouse’s credit issues can create this problem, too, as the income the spouse plans to actually chip in toward the mortgage cannot be considered by a lender.

But increasingly, the recent vagaries of the job market are also causing this issue, as people who have changed their line of work or have changed from salaried employee to freelancer over the last couple of years can also have their home loan applications rejected based on income.

2. Muddled money matters. If the mortgage for which you’re applying plus your monthly payments on credit card, car and student loan debts will comprise more than 45 percent of your total income, you could have problems qualifying for a home loan. You might also run into problems if you rely too heavily on bonuses, overtime, cash wages or rental income — all of these can be difficult or impossible to get a mortgage bank to consider, and if they do, they might not take all of it into account.

3. Credit issues. Today, the mortgage-qualifying FICO score cutoff falls somewhere between 620 and 660, depending on which lender and which loan type you seek. More than one-third of Americans, by some numbers, have credit scores too low to qualify for a home loan. Even if your credit score is high enough to qualify, if you have any late mortgage payments, a short sale, a foreclosure or a bankruptcy in the last two years, loan qualifying could be difficult to impossible.

4. Property didn’t appraise. Since the whole industry had its hand smacked for allowing home values to skyrocket in a very short time, appraisal guidelines have tightened up — some would say, even more than overall mortgage guidelines. So, it is increasingly common to have the property appraise for a price lower than the sale price negotiated between the buyer and seller.

This is especially common in the refinance realm, as well over a quarter of U.S. homes are now upside-down, meaning the mortgage balance owed is greater than the value of the home.

5. Condition problems. With all the distressed properties on the market, and with most non-distressed sellers barely breaking even, more home-sale transactions than ever are falling apart due to condition problems with the property. Many lenders will not extend financing on homes where the appraiser points out problems like cracked or broken windows, missing kitchen appliances, electrical problems, or wood rot.

And in the world of condos and other units that belong to a homeowners association, if more than 25 percent of units are rented (rather than owner-occupied) or more than 15 percent are delinquent on their HOA dues, new applications for refinance or purchase mortgages on units in the development are likely to be rejected.

6. Technical difficulties with application. The days when lenders just took your word for it are long, long gone. Applications with incomplete or unverifiable information are doomed.

If any of these mortgage loan application glitches arise in your homebuying or refinancing process, it’s critical that you connect with your mortgage professional, be it your banker or mortgage broker, to determine what course of action to take.

In some cases, it might be as simple as buying a stove you find at Craigslist and installing it before escrow closes; but with income issues your mortgage pro will need to help you determine whether it makes sense to pay some bills down, get a co-signer, or even wait six months so your income documentation will qualify.

Tara-Nicholle Nelson is an author and the Consumer Ambassador and Educator for real estate listings search site Trulia.com.

Mortgage aid open to more Calif. borrowers

A state-run program that helps homeowners struggling to pay their mortgages now has broader eligibility guidelines, opening up help to borrowers who did “cash-out” refinances and own multiple properties, said California Housing Finance Agency officials on Monday.

The mortgage-aid effort, called Keep Your Home California, so far has helped close to 8,000 low- and moderate-income households that are behind on loan payments or close to default, according to agency leaders.

Keep Your Home California“This expanded eligibility will allow more families to qualify and receive greater assistance,” said California Housing Finance Agency Executive Director Claudia Cappio, in a statement. “We are continuously evaluating our experience so far and making adjustments like these based on the initial results of the Keep Your Home California program.”

Keep Your Home California has four parts that include: mortgage help for the unemployed, mortgage aid for homeowners with documented financial hardship, relocation help for those in the midst of a short sale or deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, and reduction of principal. The programs, paid for by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Hardest Hit Fund, is costing taxpayers $2 billion.

Monday’s announced changes include:

–Allowing homeowners who completed “cash-out” mortgage refinancing to take part in the four programs. Such borrowers were excluded before.

–Allowing borrowers who own more than one property to apply. Program officials said this will be particularly helpful to those who co-signed on properties for family members.

–Offering mortgage aid to unemployed borrowers for nine months, instead of six. Such homeowners can get up to $3,000 a month. To qualify, you must receive unemployment benefits.

–Reinstating up to $20,000 in past-due mortgage payments instead of the previous $15,000 cap.

To qualify, your mortgage servicer must take part in Keep Your Home California. Click here for the list of servicers.

Info: Call 888-954-KEEP(5337) between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. Visit: www.KeepYourHomeCalifornia.org or www.ConservaTuCasaCalifornia.org.

This article is from SignOnSanDiego: “Mortgage Aid Open to More Calif. Borrowers.”

New listing in La Mesa!

Outstanding price–making for a fantastic buy! Situated high on a hill, this ranch-style home has panoramic views of the valley below. With 4 bedroom and 2.5 baths, this home has plenty of room. Warm wood flooring, dark wood cabinetry, and granite counters make this an inviting home. Seller will entertain offers between $365,000 and $409,876. 

Please give me a call at (619) 890-3648 or email me at JohnASilva@sbcglobal.net for more information or to view the home.  You can also go to postlets.com for more details.

ING Attempting to Steal Money From United States Military Personnel in a Short Sale

The following is an excerpt of recent negotiations ongoing with ING bank for a short sale transaction. Here is an example of what certain banks are still doing to literally steal money from innocent people, let alone in this case, an active duty military stationed locally and getting ready to retire, who does not have large income.  The new short sale law SB 458 has a controversial statement that was covered in a prior blog post (viewable here: “Short Sale Memoirs & New Laws“) regarding a contribution by a seller towards closing costs as being allowed.  This fact has been confirmed by attorneys as being interpreted as a direct violation of the law due to the fact any contribution for closing costs, taxes or otherwise is directly increasing the balance of the net sale for the lender and lowering the loss for their loan, thus breaking the law.

In addition, this lender as you can see wants to also steal money from the agents, leading me to believe that the negotiating person will get a cut of whatever he brings in. This needs to completely stop as these lenders are making it hard for most agents to earn a living themselves for their families.

While this one is not over, it shows you what is partly going on in a short sale transaction, not including negotiation with buyers and other lien holders, that make the work even more cumbersome only to have your income reduced due to the greedy tendencies of lenders that are still out there.

I anticipate a successful result as long as this lender comes to their senses.

I welcome comments…..

ING logo

 ING’s letter to me:

John,

I received the 2nd lien approval, and ran the numbers. Rather than going back and forth on negotiations, here is what I need to get this deal approved:

  • $3,700 cash at closing from the seller to cover the property taxes and closing costs

o Yes, we are allowed to ask for this money, as it is not going to the mortgage or missed payments

  • 4.5% commissions to help with part of the 2nd lien.

o As I said before, your listing agreement is not with ING DIRECT, and our max commissions are 5%. This is only a .5% reduction to help the deal get approved.

I will pay the 5% commissions if the $1,300 is added to the purchase price. I have been doing this job for a while, and knows what my credit review committee needs to get a deal approved. This terms are it. Assuming all parties agree, I can finish the file and have a decision for you in a few business days.

 

And my reply:

Dear ING

The seller will not be bringing any contribution to the table. I have already stated that. Any difference in costs, including commission contribution that ING refuses to pay or absorb will have to be covered by the buyer and if the buyer refuses, then I will have to find another buyer to pay that or the property will go to foreclosure.

Any contribution by the seller can be interpreted as a contribution to the loan and this has been confirmed by numerous attorneys. You are directly taking advantage of military personnel that has sacrificed his life for 20 years for our country, besides if the property goes to foreclosure, there is no recourse on this loan by ING, only more losses. No other lien holder in a short sale has ever done this to a United States military personnel borrower. You and ING are now crossing the forbidden line of respect for our military. I hope you cause ING to reverse their stance in this case. You have a borrower trying to do a good thing by selling the property early to avoid further losses to the bank only to get penalized for it.