Tag Archives: transactions

Recently Sold Listings

just sold

 I’ve recently sold a number of listings in the San Diego county; representing either buyer, seller, or both parties in a transaction.

Please give me a call to get your house bought or sold–(619) 890-3648!

Six ways to improve your odds with a contingent sale offer

From a seller’s point of view, contingent sale offers are risky. What if the buyers’ home doesn’t sell? Will the buyers list their home too high? Is their home in good condition and ready to go on the market? Many sellers would rather wait for their own home to sell to a non-contingent buyer than face the uncertainty of a contingent sale offer.

Buyers who can buy another home only if their current home is sold need to convince sellers that it’s worth the risk to accept their contingent sale offer. One strategy that can work in your favor is to list your home for sale before you present an offer on the home you want to buy.

This lets the sellers know you are serious about selling your home. Some buyers are tentative and won’t list their home until they have an accepted offer on the one they want to buy.

A lot of home-sale transactions are put together with the help of the agents involved who communicate freely with one another. As a buyer who must first sell his current home, your listing agent can help to convince the sellers to accept your offer by arming the agent who’s representing you as a buyer with information that will help sell the deal.

Ask your listing agent to prepare recent sales information of listings in your area similar to yours that sold recently to show that your list price is in line with current market conditions in your area. The sellers will want to know how long on average it’s taking homes like yours to sell. They also may want their listing agent to talk to your listing agent to confirm the information your agent provided.

Your chance of a timely sale will depend on buyer demand for homes like yours and on how many homes like yours are currently for sale in your area. In a low-inventory market where demand is high, your home may sell quickly. If there are a lot of listings in your neighborhood, you will need to be aggressive with your list price by pricing lower than your competition.

HOUSE HUNTING TIP: The sellers will want to know how long it will take for you to put your home on the multiple listing service. They are unlikely to wait a month or so for you to get your home ready for sale. As soon as you have made the decision to buy a new home and sell your current one, you should start preparing it for sale. This will make it possible for you to put your home on the market quickly.

If you find your dream home earlier than you thought you would and your home is not ready to market, enlist your agent’s aid in lining up a crew — handyman, painter, stager, etc. — to assist you with a fast prep-for-sale project. Ask friends and relatives to help with decluttering, donating what you no longer want, and packing up items to go to storage that you want to keep.

Before you make an offer, make sure you can provide the sellers with a letter from your loan agent or mortgage broker that indicates you are creditworthy and have the financial means to close the sale once your current home is sold.

Although it may seem silly, write a sincere letter to the sellers about how much you like or love their home and why you want to buy it. Sellers who have a pride of ownership and an emotional attachment to their home can be swayed in the right direction by a well-crafted letter.

THE CLOSING: Offer to pay the asking price, or more, if the market warrants it. Buyers usually pay a premium for a contingent sale offer.

Dian Hymer is a real estate broker with more than 30 years’ experience and is a nationally syndicated real estate columnist and author.

Just Sold! El Cajon Listing

I recently sold a listing in El Cajon; representing both buyer and seller in this transaction.

Please don’t hesitate to give me a call if you have any questions about buying or selling your home! – John A Silva | (619) 890-3648

San Diego home prices increase

San Diego home prices are at 4-year high

“Home prices in San Diego County, still far from their pre-recession peaks, have risen to their highest level in four years, Tuesday’s DataQuick report shows. Home sales, which went through a five-month positive streak, have dropped.

The median price for all homes sold in July was $342,000. That’s the highest it’s been since August 2008, when the economy was in the dumps and the local median price was $350,000. The county peaked at $517,500 in November 2005.

July’s median price increased 1.9 percent from $335,500 recorded in June, and up 5.2 percent from the same time last year. Price boosts were most evident among condo resales. All five regions of the county saw price increases from a year ago. The hottest area was central San Diego, where the median price rose from $226,750 to $267,000, or nearly 18 percent.

The county recorded 3,565 sales in July, marking the first sales drop in five months. Transactions fell 5.1 percent from June, but they’re 17.2 percent higher than a year ago…”

Read the original article by Lily Leung at U~T San Diego here: “San Diego home prices are at 4-year high”.

Three considerations before listing low to get multiple offers

Three considerations before listing low to get multiple offers

Q: What happens when you start out listing your home at a low price to entice buyers and the first offer is full price but no other offers come in? Are you stuck selling at the lower price (at which you never actually intended to sell)?

A: With multiple offers on the comeback, many savvy sellers are pricing their homes on the low end with the intention to drive buyer interest and — fingers crossed — generate multiple offers. In markets where rising buyer activity and home values have already begun to decrease the inventory of available homes for sale, this strategy has been very effective. However, there is always the risk of precisely the problem you pose: What happens if you get only a single offer at the asking price?

Here are several pieces of advice for sellers who are worried about what happens when listing low doesn’t result in multiple offers:

multiple offers1. Consider what the offer you get does and does not mean. You are never obligated to sell your home at a price you don’t want to, no matter how close the offer is to what you are asking for the property. I’ve actually seen a couple of situations in which sellers get a single full-price offer and reject it or issue a counteroffer, sometimes because they are in the situation you describe, and other times because it has come to their attention that they owe more on the home than they expected. (Don’t plan on doing this, though; it is a strategy with a high likelihood for disgusting a buyer and turning them all the way off.)

The reality is that, if you get only one offer at a given price, that may truly be the fair market value of your home even if you think you might have gotten a higher offer for the property had you asked for more. To live in that world of “what might have happened if” is to torture yourself with the impossibility of guessing at what a hypothetical situation would have turned out like. The real deal is that if you had asked for more, it’s possible you would have gotten more. It’s equally possible that the one buyer who did make an offer would never even have come to see the property.

2. Understand your listing agreement before you list it low. Under some listing agreements (your contract with the agent who lists your home for sale), a full-price, cash offer with no contingencies may obligate you to pay a commission even if “full price” is the discount price you set in an effort to get multiple offers. You can negotiate to change the default terms of your listing agreement, though, so that you are obligated to only pay a commission on a transaction that actually closes. You would need to do this before signing the agreement, and before the home goes on the market.

Get some legal advice from a local attorney if you don’t feel you completely understand the terms and implications of your listing agreement before you sign it and before you set the list price of your home.

3. Don’t list your home at a price you’d be upset to receive for it. The savvy sellers who list their homes on the low end to generate multiple offers are not listing their properties hundreds of thousands of dollars below their fair market value, or even making them the lowest-priced home in the neighborhood. Smart, aggressive pricing is listing a home at what seems like the low end of the range of comparable-supported prices or a slight discount from that — about a 2-5 percent discount, not 40 or 50, or 70 percent.

Many sellers are OK with taking the risk that their home might sell at 2 percent below the comparables as a trade-off for the opportunity to generate multiple offers and the possibility of receiving a premium sale price. And if you are a seller considering listing low, you should be aware of the potential trade-offs, and should make that decision only if you have market data to support the fact that this strategy makes sense in your local market.

To be crystal clear, as a seller, you should not list your home at a price you would be upset about receiving or unwilling to accept.

And remember that “listing it low” is a strategy that has proven to be successful for people specifically aiming to generate multiple offers in the many markets that currently support multiple offers. If your objective is simply to sell your home — period — in a down market, for example, then this may not be the route for you to take.

Every market is different, and every home and seller is different. If your market is still very soft or you don’t see any multiple offers happening in your town, you may not be able to generate loads of offers no matter what you price your home at. As always, work with your agent and take a long hard look at your local market dynamics before deciding on a pricing strategy.

Tara-Nicholle Nelson is an author and the Consumer Ambassador and Educator for real estate listings search site Trulia.com.

Is the San Diego real estate market heating up?

Is the spring homebuying season heating up?

Last month, San Diego County saw its highest home-sale count for a March month since 2006 as it entered another spring home-buying season, Tuesday’s numbers from DataQuick show.

A total of 3,237 homes were sold in March, up 19.5 percent from February and up nearly 6 percent from a year ago. Big percentage bumps are natural from February to March throughout Southern California, historical records show, but it appears this is the best March San Diego County has seen in six years, when a total of 4,367 homes were sold.

Improvement aside, sales are still far below from pre-recession levels. The current housing cycle’s peak was 6,926 transactions in June 2004.

“The year is young and lots could still change,” said DataQuick John Walsh in the company’s latest Southern California report. “But the results from the first big sales month of 2012 suggest the market is stuck in low gear. This remains a very gradual – not to mention fragile – recovery.”

Sales saw the most oomph in the markets of single-family resales and new properties, in which tallies increased almost 10 percent and 27 percent, respectively, from a year ago. However, both submarkets saw their values in March fall from a year ago. Prices for single-family resales dropped 4.2 percent to $350,000, and almost 26 percent to $392,000 in the new-home market…

Read the rest of this article by U~T San Diego’s Lily Leung here: “Is the spring homebuying season heating up?

 

From Bad to Good-Unbelievable Results in a Short Sale!!

From Bad to Good-Unbelievable Results in a Short Sale!!

In a volatile economy with a recession in full swing, it is extremely hard for most people to imagine anything positive to happen in a bad situation. Well, with an upside down property and several liens in place, you would want to pay close attention in this article because you will find this SHOCKING!!

I just recently closed a short sale with numerous liens on the property, specifically IRS lien, child support lien, large past due HOA lien, and an active bankruptcy in place. This example is one of huge importance for the fact that the bank contributed to some of these debts despite the fact that the property had no equity. This is FREE money towards the owner’s debts. In addition, the owner of the property received bad advice before I talked to him to move out of the property and by doing so, gave up the qualifying right to receive several thousand dollars for moving and relocation expenses from the bank. This aside, the situation was still a win-win for the owner regarding getting free money from the bank to go towards debt that most likely would have to be paid through his bankruptcy Chapter 13 reorganization plan.

I have personally closed several short sale transactions with an active bankruptcy or shortly after discharge. This process is extremely valuable and very rare for any real estate agents to understand including process with these circumstances.

Another transaction I closed as a short sale in the past had 8 liens where the benefit of this one went completely to the debtor’s children in this case a child support lien in the amount of $24K and a settlement by the 1st lien holder bank paid of $12K! This is free money from the 1st Trust Deed Holder for a situation that was beyond out of control. Most of the other liens also received free money from the lien holder or were released with zero money to them.

Another transaction had liens on an upside down property from credit cards that were settled by negotiation and allowed by the lien holder. Again this is free money from a no equity sale or short sale that pays down a debt or settles them in full and in some cases I have done these has helped avoid a bankruptcy by the seller.

There are many people in situations as I mentioned above and there are literally no Real Estate Agents that know how or want to handle these situations. If you know someone with a similar situation, you will be a huge benefit to them and do a bigger charitable act by referring me to them for a no obligation, private and discreet consultation. CALL NOW! ONLY THE BEST GET THE BEST RESULTS!!

– John A. Silva

www.JohnASilva.com | (

Four steps to buying a house in 2012

Q: I am on a mission to buy a home. I’ve wanted to own a home my entire life, and thought I would miss the opportunity to buy while the market was down, because I had no real savings when the market crashed. I think I’m ready, though, and prices still seem low. What should I be doing now to make this happen in 2012?

A: The recession has done lots of favors for buyers-to-be, including dropping prices and interest rates to bargain levels. But it has also created a lending and housing market climate in which loans are tough to get, tensions about buying into a down market run high, and transactions are harder and longer to close than they have ever been.

Here are the things to do now, to buy a home this year:

1. Fix credit problems. More deals than ever are dying on the vine, and credit problems are a top reason home-sale transactions fall out of escrow. Detect and correct errors on your credit report now by reviewing the federally mandated free reports you can get at AnnualCreditReport.com.

2. Study up. Do some research, both online and offline, into things like:

Areas: Start your online research into decision points like tax rates, school districts, neighborhood character and even prices in various areas. Check out NabeWise.com for some local insight into neighborhood flavor and personality.

When you start connecting with local agents, ask them to brief you on neighborhood market dynamics. They can give you a deeper view into need-to-knows like how long homes typically stay on the market and whether they generally go for more or less than the asking price, so you can be smart about how you search vis-à-vis what you have to spend.

Agents: This is the perfect time to ask your family and friends for a referral to an agent they know, have used and love. Then, follow up by doing an online search for the agent’s name and seeing what sort of online reviews and activities you find. When you’ve narrowed the field down to a few, call them up and set up a meeting to find out if you’re a good fit.

Distressed properties: In some areas, more than 40 percent of the homes on the market are short sales and foreclosures, and they involve a very different timeline and set of facts than traditional home sales. Read up and talk with the agent candidates you interview about what you should expect from these types of listings, to minimize surprise and manage your expectations way in advance.

3. Save even more. Sounds like you’ve worked hard for a number of years to save enough cash that you think you’re in the clear when it comes to funding your down payment and closing costs. Studies show that after months of saving, people often let up and relax into a spending season. Even at your early stage in the process, it’s easy to start noticing and buying the furnishings and touches you want to install in your new home.

Although you shouldn’t feel deprived or forgo amazing and affordable deals on things you know you’re going to need, rest assured that no matter what amount of cash you have on hand, when you start house hunting, making offers, closing your transaction or moving in, the time will definitely come when you’ll wish you had more.

You might want to ratchet up your offer a bit to best another buyer, or you might just end up with a place that needs a little sprucing up. It might be months before you know exactly what you’ll need extra cash for, but now is not the time to press the gas pedal when it comes to your monthly spending.

4. Purge. Now’s the time to sell, donate or give away as much of your personal possessions as you can. Use the proceeds to pad your cash cushion, or tuck the donation receipts away for your tax records next year.

Start here, and chances are good that your house hunt — and purchase — will be in full swing by spring, if not sooner.

Tara-Nicholle Nelson is an author and the Consumer Ambassador and Educator for real estate listings search site Trulia.com.