Tag Archives: US

It’s Labor Day!

Celebrating American workers!

First United States Labor Day Parade, September 5, 1882 in New York City.

First United States Labor Day Parade, September 5, 1882 in New York City.

“Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country” (“History of Labor Day.” Department of Labor. https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history).

Enjoy the holiday! (Perhaps with a San Diego event?)

Thank you for working so hard to make our country an even better one!

REO Inventory in 2011

RealtyTrac’s year-end report released Thursday shows foreclosure filings – including default, auction, and bank repossession notices – were reported on 1,887,777 U.S. properties in 2011. Of that total, 804,423 homes were taken back by lenders as REO.

Last year’s tally of nearly 1.9 million properties with a foreclosure filing seems staggering, but it’s actually the lowest reported since 2007. It’s 34 percent below 2010, 33 percent below 2009, and 19 percent below the 2008 total.

RealtyTrac’s newly appointed CEO Brandon Moore describes foreclosure activity last year as being in “full delay mode.”

“The lack of clarity regarding many of the documentation and legal issues plaguing the foreclosure industry means that we are continuing to see a highly dysfunctional foreclosure process that is inefficiently dealing with delinquent mortgages – particularly in states with a judicial foreclosure process,” Moore said.

These delays, however, may be coming to an end. Moore says there were strong signs in the second half of 2011 that indicate lenders are finally beginning to push stalled foreclosures through in select local markets.

“We expect that trend to continue this year, boosting foreclosure activity for 2012 higher than it was in 2011, though still below the peak of 2010,” Moore said.

Despite signs that some markets are experiencing a pickup in foreclosures, RealtyTrac’s analysis shows that processing timelines continued to increase.

On the national stage, properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter took an average of 348 days to complete the process, up from 336 days in the third quarter and up from 305 days in the fourth quarter of 2010.

RealtyTrac says the length of the average foreclosure process has increased 24 percent from the third quarter of 2010, when lenders began to re-evaluate foreclosure procedures as a result of documentation and affidavit errors.

New York holds the title of ‘longest foreclosure process in the nation’ – an average of 1,019 days.

New Jersey documented the nation’s second longest end-to-end foreclosure process, at 964 days. Florida has the third longest at 806 days. Foreclosure activity in both these states dropped more than 60 percent from 2010 to 2011.

All three states with the longest foreclosure timelines employ the judicial foreclosure process.

Texas continues to register the shortest average foreclosure process of any state, at 90 days, but that still represents an increase from 86 days in the third quarter and 81 days in the fourth quarter of 2010.

At 106 days, Delaware has the second shortest foreclosure timeline in the nation, and Kentucky lays claim to the third shortest, at 108 days.

More than 6 percent of Nevada housing units (one in 16) had at least one foreclosure filing in 2011, giving it the nation’s highest state foreclosure rate for the fifth consecutive year. That’s despite a 31 percent decrease in foreclosure activity from 2010.

Arizona registered the nation’s second highest foreclosure rate for the third year in a row, with 4.14 percent of its homes (one in 24) receiving at least one filing in 2011.

California registered the nation’s third highest foreclosure rate for all of 2011, with 3.19 percent (one in every 31 homes).

Other states with 2011 foreclosure rates ranking among the nation’s 10 highest include: Georgia (2.71 percent), Utah (2.32 percent), Michigan (2.21 percent), Florida (2.06 percent), Illinois (1.95 percent), Colorado (1.78 percent), and Idaho (1.77 percent).

This article is by DSNews.com: “New REO Inventory in 2011=804,423 Homes.”

Unemployment Rate Falls to 8.5%

The nation’s unemployment rate continues to trend down. It slipped to 8.5 percent during the month of December as the economy added 200,000 new jobs, the U.S. Department of Labor said Friday morning.

The reported rate is down from 8.6 percent in November. The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for November was revised downward from +120,000 to +100,000. October’s data was revised upward from +100,000 to +112,000.

December’s results were better than expected, with the consensus forecast among analysts looking for the rate to inch up to 8.7 percent and net job growth over the month to tally 150,000.

December marks the sixth consecutive month of 100,000-plus job gains and the first such stretch employers have been able to string together since 2006.

The number of long-term unemployed – those jobless for 27 weeks or more – was little changed in December at 5.6 million and accounted for 42.5 percent of the unemployed.

The unemployment rate has declined by 0.6 percentage point since August, according to the Labor Department. At 8.5 percent, the rate ended 2011 at its lowest level in nearly three years.

Over the 2011 calendar year, nonfarm payroll employment rose by 1.6 million, up sharply from the 940,000 jobs added in 2010.

Employment in the private sector rose by 212,000 in December and by 1.9 million over the year.

Government employment changed little over the month but fell by 280,000 over the year.

The national unemployment rate averaged 8.9 percent in 2011, compared to 9.6 percent in 2010.

This article is from DSNews.com: “Unemployment Rate Falls to 8.5%“.

2011 had lowest mortgage rates on record

You’ve probably been hearing all year long how mortgage interest rates were at record lows.

Now, the final data is in. And it shows that 2011 had the lowest average interest rates in the 41 years that mortgage giant Freddie Mac has been tracking loan rates.

Specifically, the U.S. average was 4.45% on the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, Freddie Mac reported. That beats the previous low of 4.69% set in 2010.

The past two years are the only ones in Freddie Mac’s records in which the annual average rates were below 5% for a 30-year, fixed-rate loan. In 1981, 30-year mortgage rates averaged nearly 17%. As recently as 2008, rates were averaging above 6%.

Interest rates fell below 4% for the first time in Freddie Mac’s data in October – and stayed at or below 4% for the last nine weeks of the year. Thirty-year rates set six records last year, falling to an all-time low of 3.91% on Dec. 22.

Other types of mortgages were in record territory as well. According to Freddie Mac:

  • Fifteen-year, fixed-rate mortgages set eight records in 2011, falling to an all-time low of 3.21% on Dec. 15.
  • Five-year, adjustable-rate mortgages set nine records in 2011, falling to an all-time low of 2.85% on Dec. 22.
  • One-year, adjustable-rate mortgages set 14 records in 2011, falling to an all-time low of 2.77% on Dec. 22.

The record low mortgage rates failed to spark a revival in the housing market, with fewer buyers able to qualify for a loan or able to afford to purchase a home. Overall, local and U.S. home sales remain well below average levels.

This article is from the Orange County Register; read it here: 2011 had lowest mortgage rates on record.”

No rise in US real estate prices before 2014?

Two prominent home-price indices continued to show declines in September and October, with one outlook indicating no more than flat growth in the next two years.

A home-price index report from loan data aggregator Lender Processing Services showed the national average sales price for single-family homes fell 4.4 percent year over year and 1.2 percent month to month in September, to $202,000.

LPS’ Home Price Index, launched in July, tracks monthly sales in more than 13,500 ZIP codes. Within each ZIP code, the index shows historical price changes for five home-price levels, including entry-level, middle-market and high-end homes.

Prices declined on a monthly basis in all ZIP codes covered by LPS. The top 20 percent of homes (selling for more than $317,000) saw a slightly smaller monthly decline, 1.2 percent, than the lowest 20 percent (selling for less than $102,000), which saw a 1.4 percent drop.

“Home prices in September were consistent with the seasonal pattern that has been occurring since 2009,” said Kyle Lundstedt, LPS Applied Analytics’ managing director, in a statement.Real estate prediction for 2012

“Each year, prices have risen in the spring, but revert in autumn to a downward trend that has not only erased the gains, but has led to an average 3.7 percent annual drop in prices to date. The partial data available for October suggests a further approximate decline of 1.1 percent.”

A report released by property data firm CoreLogic bears out the monthly decline in October. For the third straight month, nationwide single-family home prices fell on both a monthly and yearly basis, dropping 1.3 percent from September and 3.9 percent from October 2010. Excluding distressed sales (short sales and real estate owned home sales, also known as REOs), October’s index fell 0.5 percent from a year ago.

“Home prices continue to decline in response to the weak demand for housing. While many housing statistics are basically moving sideways, prices continue to correct for a supply and demand imbalance. Looking forward, our forecasts indicate flat growth through 2013,” said Mark Fleming, chief economist for CoreLogic, in a statement.

The index was down 32 percent in October from an April 2006 peak. Excluding distressed sales, the drop was 22.4 percent. CoreLogic’s index is based on 30 years of data for repeat sales transactions, and “price, time between sales, property type, loan type and distressed sales.”

Among the 10 most populous metropolitan areas in the country, six saw index declines in October. Only Washington, D.C., and New York-White Plains-Wayne, N.Y.-N.J., saw index increases above 1 percent. When distressed sales were excluded, six experienced index increases.

Most states, 34, experienced year-over-year index drops in October. Ten states and Washington, D.C., saw index rises of more than 1 percent. West Virginia led the way with a 4.8 percent annual rise.

At the other end of the spectrum, Nevada was the only state to see a double-digit index drop in October, down 12.1 percent. When distressed sales were excluded, 28 states and Washington, D.C., saw flat or rising home prices. South Carolina posted the biggest increase, up 4.6 percent.

What’s in store for the housing market in 2012?

2011 was supposed to ratchet up steady, if not, robust growth in the US economy. However, several economic and geo-political events tripped up the economy during the year that have left would be home buyers dazed and confused about jumping into the housing market.
2011: A Year of Wild CardsLooking in the rearview mirror: 2011

Here’s what we know–2011 has been wrought with uncertainty and unexpected shocks that has hobbled output in the US and around the globe and caused a huge crisis of confidence for consumers, investors, and businesses alike. The list of wildcards is long: the DC midterm elections, the change of power in the House, the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the Arab uprising, the oil price shocks, the European debt crisis, the battle over debt ceiling, the downgrading of the US long-term debt, and the fallout with the volatility in the stock market. All of which have left output through the first half of the year below the growth rates that accompany a recovery. The probability of a double-dip recession has gone up and has caused economists far and wide to downgrade their outlook for this year and next.

What does next year have in store for housing?

California Housing Market OutlookHere is what C.A.R. is forecasting for 2012:
  • While the probability for a double-dip recession is higher, the most likely scenario is for a continuation of the slow-moderate growth we have seen for the last few years. The outlook is for modest but positive growth with GDP coming in at 1.7% in 2011, 2.0% in 2012.
  • We are moving forward, albeit bouncing along the bottom for most of 2011 and we can expect the same for next year, with a flat sales forecast for 2011/2012 (-0.1% year-to-year loss in 2011 and 1.0% gain in 2012).
  • Prices are expected to come in 4% below 2010 levels and should show a modest gain in 2012 (+1.7% year-over-year).

Overall, we’ve seen uncertainty and a lack of urgency put a damper on the housing market in 2011.

Hopefully, 2012 will prove less uncertain and could even show signs of urgency as current prices and mortgage rates are phenomenal and will not stay this low forever.

New Modification Law & Avoiding Foreclosure

A new law that will be implemented on November 15, 2011 is yet another slap in the face to the American Homeowner regarding modifications.

Making Home AffordableThe basic eligibility requirements for an enhanced HARP (Home Affordable Refinance Program) loan are as follows:

  • Existing mortgage loan must be owned or guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. To check whether a borrower has a Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac loan, go to MakingHomeAffordable.gov’s page on “Look up your loan“.
  • Existing mortgage loan must have been sold to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac before June 1, 2009.
  • Existing mortgage loan cannot have been refinanced under HARP previously (except for Fannie Mae loans refinanced between March and May 2009).
  • Current loan-to-value (LTV) ratio must be more than 80%.
  • Existing mortgage loan must be current, with no late payments in the past six months, and no more than one late payment in the past 12 months.

More information is available from the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) on the agency’s website: www.fhfa.gov.

The reason why HARP is not good, is the same basic reason that HAMP (Home Affordable Modification Program) and the traditional modification is as follows:

It is strictly voluntary with all lenders; even though they say they participate.  Of course, there are factors with the seller or borrower that have an affect on being put in a modification plan that eliminate many from it.  This problem could be avoided if the banks would just lower the loan amount to the fair market value and a greater percent of people would have been able to keep their homes.  Even a future shared equity with the lender would have been acceptable if the property was sold for a profit in the future. Few banks are offering this program as well.

In conclusion, it is obviously important that we talk ASAP to go over your situation. I have several associates waiting to help: accountants, attorneys, and credit repair company.  If you’re moving on, getting back on track with your credit, staying in your home with an extended time without payments due in order to recoup finances, and most importantly receiving thousands from your bank at closing are all opportunities within your grasp!  I am just a phone call away!

John | (619) 890-3648

Namaste!

Industry’s Past-Due Mortgages Continue to Drop

How many homeowners in the United States are behind on their mortgage payments? It’s 6,373,000, according to Lender Processing Services (LPS).

past due mortgagesThe number is staggering, but it’s actually on the decline, down from 6,397,000 as of the end of August, and 6,538,000 at the end of July.

LPS offered the media an advance look at the high-level numbers from its mortgage performance report due out later this month.

The company’s data, which is derived from its loan-level database of nearly 40 million mortgage loans, provides evidence that servicers are pushing those loans that have been languishing in non-payment status through the pipeline at a faster pace.

At September month-end, the national mortgage delinquency rate – which includes loans 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure – stood at 8.09 percent. That’s down 0.5 percent from the previous month and 12.7 percent from a year earlier.

At the same time, the foreclosure inventory rate – which LPS calculates as loans that have been referred to an attorney but have not yet reached the final stage of foreclosure sale – rose to 4.18 percent in September, up 1.7 percent from August and up 8.9 percent from September of last year.

The same trend of a declining delinquency rate and rising foreclosure rate was reported last month as well.

Of the 6,373,000 mortgage going unpaid in the United States, LPS says approximately 2,172,000 are part of the foreclosure pre-sale inventory.

The remaining 4,202,000 are 30-plus days delinquent but not yet in foreclosure. Of these, 1,844,000 are past due by 90 days or more.

According to LPS’ September study, the five states with highest percentage of non-current loans – which combines foreclosures and delinquencies – have held onto their rankings for three consecutive months. These include: Florida, Mississippi, Nevada, New Jersey, and Illinois.

States with the lowest percentage of non-current loans include: Montana, Alaska, Wyoming, South Dakota, and North Dakota.

This article, “Industry’s Past-Due Mortgages Continue to Drop,” is by Carrie Bay at DSNews.com.